Butternut Squash Soup

Butternut squash soup is something that I could eat nearly everyday during the winter months. Hearty, filling, healthy, and delicious. I found a recipe for it about 5 years ago, and since then, I’ve tweaked it to make it my own. I found the act of peeling the butternut squash simply ridiculous. It is insanely hard to peel a raw butternut squash. Then, while in Miami, a friend ordered some butternut squash at a restaurant and it arrived roasted with the skin on. MIND BLOWN. I decided then to stop peeling the squash for these three reasons. 1) It’s way too hard, 2) I’m going to puree the soup with an immersion blender anyways, and 3) the skin is where the nutrients are! So here is my favorite recipe for butternut squash soup. Enjoy!

Butternut Squash Soup [21DSD, Paleo, Vegetarian, Primal]

Recipe:

1 large butternut squash, seeded and chopped

6 ribs of celery, chopped

6 carrots, chopped

1 medium onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped

2 cups water

2 T butter

2 cups bone broth (or veggie broth)

1 T cumin

1 T coriander

1 T turmeric

1 T paprika

1 T garlic salt

1 t  pepper

2 T coconut sugar (optional)

2 lemons, juiced

Optional: Raw sour cream (or raw plain yogurt), for serving

Optional: Cilantro, for serving

Directions:

  1. Place a vegetable steamer in a large stock pot. Add water, butter, and butternut squash. Steam the butternut squash until pierced easily with a knife.
  2. Once steamed, place squash in stock pot (leave water in pot). Add carrots, celery, onions, and garlic. Add broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer. 
  3. Add cumin and the next six ingredients. Keep at simmer for about 30 minutes. Remove from heat, and allow to cool for about 15 minutes.
  4. Use an immersion blender to purée soup (regular blender or food processor will also work).  Add lemon juice. Serve with a dollop of sour cream or plain yogurt and garnish with cilantro. Makes about 8 servings. 

Onions are a good source of vitamins C and B6, potassium, and manganese. They are also rich in antioxidants, particularly quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin, which all play a role in cancer prevention. Onions also help to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.

Carrots are good sources of vitamins A, C, B6 & K, biotin, potassium, thiamine, and fiber. They are also rich in antioxidants and good source of starchy carbohydrates.

Butternut Squash is a good source of antioxidant carotenoids, vitamins C, B1, B6, folic acid, and pantothenic acid. It is also a good source of potassium, manganese, and fiber. Dark-fleshed winter squash is shown to be protective against cancer, especially lung cancer, heart disease, and and type II diabetes.

Sources:

Murray, M., Pizzorno, J., & Pizzorno, L. (2005). Encyclopedia of Healing Foods
New York, NY: Atria Books.

 Reinhard, T (2014). Superfoods: The Healthiest Foods on the Planet
Buffalo, NY: Firefly Books. 

21 DSD Hacks

For those of you brave and committed souls (BIG UPS TO YOU!) that are a part ofIMG_6867 my 21 DSD group, here are my best suggestions for being successful while on the the 21DSD.

  1. Participate in the 21 DSD with a buddy. Spouse, parent, child, friend, or neighbor – it’ll be much easier than going it alone. BUT being a part of our group also provides that “buddy” support.
  2. Meal Plan. When you have planned your weekly meals ahead of time, success is much easier. We intentionally start the 21 DSD on a Monday so that you can go grocery shopping and do some meal prepping on the weekend beforehand.
  3. Meal prepping. All of my most successful “healthy food weeks” were successful because I spent time on the weekend cooking 1-2 meals, cutting veggies, reviewing recipes, etc. This is true for most people that I encounter.
  4. Try some recipes from the cookbook ahead of time. Find a few favorites and work out the kinks. This will help to ensure a smoother 21 DSD.
  5. Grocery Store Hacks. It’s no secret that grocery shopping on a Sunday is NUTS! But there are other great ways to save time buying groceries.
    • Thrive Market. This is essentially the same as the pantry aisles at Whole Foods. You choose your groceries online and they are shipped right to your door. It takes about 3-5 days to arrive. Everything on Thrive is discounted from the typical Whole Foods prices. Register for a 30-day free trial – you get 15% off your first purchase. If you decide to becoming a paying member (like Costco) it is $59.95 per year. Free shipping for all orders over $49. This is a HUGE time saver for me. Here’s a referral code: http://thrv.me/iYVWfd
    • Join a weekly CSA – have local fruits and veggies delivered to your door. This is another great option to help save time. This website is helpful for finding the right CSA for you. http://www.localharvest.org/csa/
    • Saving time with these grocery shopping hacks will free up time for you to spend prepping and cooking meals. If you aren’t used to cooking most of your own meals, this step will be HUGE!
  6. Dining Out? If you’re dining out here are a few tips:
    • Avoid being starving. I always have some snacks at my desk, in my car, or in my purse. This will keep you from being tempted to eat the free bread. Better yet – tell your server not to bring any bread to the table. [BTW – If you’re always starving, you may want to up your fat and starchy vegetable intake.]
    • Look at the menu ahead of time. Have a game plan for a couple of options of what you can eat at that restaurant (and know what you’ll have to ask them to remove). I always ask for double veggies instead of rice. Don’t be afraid to ask for what you need. Servers are more than willing to be accommodating as long as you ask nicely!
    • Avoid choosing the restaurant that serves your favorite [insert non-21 DSD food here]. If you love and cannot resist pasta, don’t go to Maggiano’s or The Spaghetti Factory. If you love and can’t resist fries and a milkshake, avoid going to The Counter.
    • Stay tuned for my local dining out suggestions!
  7. If cooking and meal prepping are new to you or you’re just feeling BUSY and overwhelmed, here are a few hacks:
    • Buy the pre-cut veggies at the store
    • Buy a rotisserie chicken from Whole Foods
    • Smoked Salmon (ready to eat from TJ’s or Whole foods)
    • Buy the pre-washed lettuce and salad fixings for quick and easy salads
    • Crockpot meals!!
    • Pressure Cooker Meals (even more !!! than crockpot meals!)
    • Use a food processor for quick chopping of a bunch of veggies
    • Cook in bulk. I ALWAYS cook enough for leftovers. My bare minimum goal is four meals from every recipe (i.e. dinner and lunch the next day for both Jim and I). But usually I try for even more meals than four.
    • Soups. They are relatively easy to make, they’re healthy, and they provide 6+ meals. You can also freeze extra soup!
    • When I’m feeling overwhelmed with too much to cook and do in the evening, I choose the quickest dinner possible out of the available options and I get that chopped, prepared, and cooking. While tonight’s dinner is cooking, I ALWAYS do some additional food prep/cooking. [Just continue working in the kitchen until dinner is done cooking.] Whether it is just cutting up veggies for salads the next day or prepping my salmon to roast in the oven. [Side note: I’m ALWAYS listening to a Podcast or an Audible audiobook – just ask Jim. I feel much more productive if I’m chopping and “reading” or washing dishes and “reading”.]
  8. When you’re feeling like quitting, remember these two things:
    • It’s only three weeks. You can literally do anything for three weeks. 🙂
    • Don’t focus on the things that you are giving up. Instead, focus on what you gain: freedom body pains and problems, control over food, and health.

Don’t hesitate to reach out for help. You can do this!!!!

Hugs and Health <3,

Katie

The 5-R Protocol for Digestive Health

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I wrote this article for an assignment on autoimmune conditions, specifically Lupus. However, this applies to anyone that is looking to determine what is “off” with their digestion, what food triggers they may have, or trying to solve other “unsolved mysteries” about what may be causing skin problems, headaches, etc. Enjoy!

To address autoimmune conditions like Lupus, the 5-R Protocol would be highly recommended. It is like a “jump-start” into the diet plan that should be continued for optimal immune health. By removing offending foods, the body stops reacting negatively to those foods and can begin to use its nutrient resources to heal itself. Additionally, 80% of the immune system is in the digestive system and a healthy digestive system is key for a healthy immune system.

  1. Remove: Eliminate foods that are processed and devoid of nutrients, poor-quality fats, parasites, heavy metals, and foods that are potential triggers. Potential triggers include gluten-containing grains (wheat, barley, rye, spelt, and kamut), nightshade vegetables (tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, and peppers) dairy, soy, and possibly fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, and eggs. Each person will have to decide what he or she needs to eliminate.
  2. Replace: Once the offending foods have been removed, it is time to replace them with nutrient-rich, whole-foods. This step also includes replacing missing nutrients using supplements, as well as adding in digestive supports like digestive enzymes, bile salts, and hydrochloric acid.
  3. Reinoculate: The digestive system is home to billions of bacteria that we rely on to help digest food, protect us from foreign invaders, and to help make short chain fatty acids that we need. Over the years, our diets have been lacking in healthy bacteria and we take many medications that kill off the necessary bacteria. These healthy bacteria are found in cultured dairy products like yogurt and kefir, and in fermented foods like kombucha, sauerkraut, and kimchi. Supplementation with probiotics can begin with 10-20 billion per day and can increase gradually to 50-100 billion (Bauman, 2015).
  4. Repair: Over time, our standard diets have also damaged our digestive system’s ability to properly breakdown foods and absorb nutrients. Using foods like bone broth, grass-fed gelatin, and foods rich in fiber will help to repair and clean out the intestines. Additional supplements that can help to heal include: glutamine, gamma-oryzanol, boswellia, licorice, quercetin, goldenseal, aloe, marshmallow root, essential fatty acids, and cabbage.
  5. Rebalance: Digestion starts in the brain. If your mindset isn’t in the “right” place, proper digestion will not occur. If you are stressed, your body will be in sympathetic mode rather than in parasympathetic mode and your digestion will be compromised. The focus of step 5 is on stress management, quality sleep, adequate exercise, and a positive outlook. This last step is often a continual practice in mindfulness.

References:

Bauman, E. (6/20/15-11/30/15). Personal Communication

Lipski, E. (2013). Digestion Connection. New York, NY: Rodale.

Health & Hugs <3,

Katie

Ready to Detox? The 21 DSD Q&A

Are you on a Blood Sug1-21DSDCoach-Im-Certified-Graphicar Roller Coaster? Need coffee, sugar, or other pick me ups just to get through the day? Are you feeling like you need a reset?

Then you are in the right place! I am a Certified 21-Day Sugar Detox Coach. Please read through the Q & A before we can get started. 🙂

21 Day Sugar Detox Question and Answer:

Do I need a 21 Day Sugar Detox Coach?

Why should I get a coach for The 21 Day Sugar Detox?

  • Accountability Partner – I’ll act as a partner in helping to keep you motivated and committed to The 21DSD.
  • It’ll provide a sense of community with our group members.
  • I will provide personalized help for your specific needs.
  • It’s easier than going it alone, especially if you haven’t made drastic changes to your diet before.
  • I can provide you with suggestions for local resource options

What experiences do you have working as a Coach?

  • Worked with about 50 different clients of varying ages, health needs, and diets.
  • Specializing in blood sugar regulation, candida infections, cancer & recovery, digestion problems, pregnancy, diverticulitis, and skin problems.
  • I’m also an elementary school teacher, which is essentially an academic coach for children. 😉

How will your coaching help me personally?

  • Daily three-minute educational videos, check-ins, and support
  • Exclusive access to our 21 DSD Facebook group for resources
  • Participant workbook with The 21 DSD detox curriculum
  • Daily motivation
  • Local suggestions for eating out
  • Local suggestions for grocery shopping and shopping lists
  • In person meetings offered at a discounted rate for those that are interested (this not included in the $99 Coaching Fee)
  • Results!

Do I need to be “paleo”? Can vegetarians participate? Pregnant or Nursing Mothers? Athletes?

  • You do not have to be paleo to participate.
  • Pescetarians (vegetarians that eat fish) can participate in the 21DSD.
  • If you are pregnant or are nursing, there are modifications that you can make in order to complete the 21DSD.
  • There are also modifications for athletes as well.

How much does it cost?

  • April group Online price: $149 per person (guidebook included!)
  • Local April in-person group: $199 per person (guidebook included!)

When does the 21DSD start?

  • Our detoxes generally start on the first Monday of the month, with coaching and prepping for the detox starting the week before. You can actually start whenever you’d like, if our start date doesn’t work for you.
  • May detox begins on 5/7 and coaching begins on 4/30
  • June detox begins on 6/4 and coaching begins on 5/28

Ready to join?

I’m ready to join, Coach!

  • Simply send $149 (online)/$199 (in-person) to me via my PayPal using this email address: cleaneatingwithkatie@gmail.com
  • OR comment here and I’ll send you a PayPal invoice

I’m ready to join, Coach!  AND I want ALL THE SUPPORT

  • Click here for online membership
  • Then send $149 (online)/$199 (in-person) to me via my PayPal using this email address: cleaneatingwithkatie@gmail.com

Not ready to join?

  • I’ll be running another group starting when you’re ready! Email me!
  • I also offer one-on-one holistic nutritional counseling in which I provide menu planning, supplement suggestions, recipes, educational handouts, and more!

Refund Policy:

Participants may postpone their detox start date within three months of payment. Once materials have been distributed, no refunds will be issued.

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In Season, in December

It’s December first (not quite sure how that happened!!)! Here is the list of what’s in season in December (especially in Northern California). Mandarins are exciting to see on this list. And I’m excited to have lemons back on my tree!!

What seasonal produce are you excited for?

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Health & Hugs <3,

Katie

Ten Food Swaps

As I read more, listen to my lectures, and talk to friends and clients, I have come to the belief that there are about 10 recommendations that I often suggest to people. These same 10 suggestions apply for most people and for most health concerns. If you were trying to make healthier choices in your diet, this is a basic list that can be your jumping off point. Here are my recommendations for 10 things to add to or replace in your diet. But not until Friday. 😉 After all, tomorrow is Thanksgiving and life is for living and enjoying. You have to live your life and holiday foods most definitely qualify.

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Eat This 🙂 Instead of That 🙁
Grass-fed Butter

Butter is great to cook with because unlike most vegetable oils, it does not oxidize at low temperatures. It reduces inflammation and is rich in conjugated-linoleic acid and vitamins A, D & K2.

Margarine

Margarine is made of crop oils that are partially hydrogenated, turning them from liquid into a solid. This turns the fats into trans fats, substances that our bodies have trouble recognizing and processing.

Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is a great source of medium chain triglycerides, which are antiviral and antibacterial. These medium chain fatty acids are easily absorbed by the body and protect against heart disease and promote weight loss. It is a great high heat cooking oil, as it doesn’t oxidize at low temperatures.

All other Vegetable Oils

Vegetable oils oxidize at lower temperatures, meaning they become damaged and inflammatory when used in cooking. They are also highly processed using high heat, so they are likely damaged even before used in cooking. When exposed to light (through the clear bottles the are packaged in) further oxidation occurs.

Honey, Maple Syrup, Date Sugar, or Coconut Sugar

Coconut sugar is a low-glycemic sweetener. Both coconut sugar and date sugar are not as heavily processed as other sugars. Raw honey and maple syrup are not processed either. These all make great sugar alternatives when used in moderation.

Sugar, Agave, Artificial Sweeteners

High blood sugar is a problem with many health concerns. Artificial sweeteners are linked to declines in kidney function, brain tumors, autoimmune conditions, and are potential neurotoxins. Agave, while a low-glycemic sweetener, is heavily processed, making it similar to high-fructose corn syrup.

Raw Nuts and Seeds

Seeds contain all the nutrients for that the plant needs to start life, making them nutrient dense. They are often rich in omega-3s, great sources of protein, fats, and vitamins and minerals. Nuts and seeds have a “season” like all other produce, and can go bad like all other produce, so they should be eaten raw.

Roasted Nuts and Seeds

Similarly to crop oils, nuts and seeds oxidize when exposed to high heats, therefore roasted nuts and seeds are likely to cause oxidative damage and inflammation in the body. Nuts and seeds are also often roasted to preserve them, but also to hide the rancidity of the nuts or seeds.

Sparkling Water

For a treat, sparkling water is a nice alternative to regular filtered water. Adding fruit, a squeeze of lime juice, or some grapefruit essential oil to the sparkling water can also help to break up the repetition.

Soda

Sugary drinks actually cause the taste buds to crave more sugar. To process sugars, vitamins and minerals must be taken from the tissues, therefore repeated exposure can lead to nutrient deficiencies.

Sea Salt

The best salt choices are not white – either grey, pink, or other colors. These salts contain trace minerals that we need and can be hard to find.

Iodized Salt

Iodized salt often has added sugar and aluminum. It is also processed to remove all other trace minerals.

Spaghetti Squash, Zoodles, or Kelp Noodles

These are nutrient dense substitutions for pasta and are low in calories. Zoodles are zucchini that have been spiralized into spaghetti-like noodles.

Pasta

Pasta is a refined food that is rich in calories, but low in nutrients. While it may be tasty, it’s a modern convenience food that isn’t needed.

Tea

Herbals teas are a great alternative to coffee. Teas do not create the stress response that coffee does and are often filled with nutritional benefits.

Coffee

Coffee stimulates the adrenal glands to produce more cortisol and adrenaline, keeping the adrenals on overload. It also raises blood sugar and depletes vitamins and minerals.

Full-fat Dairy

Dairy is a good source of protein, healthy fats, calcium and fat-soluble vitamins A, D, and K2.

Nonfat Dairy

When you remove the fat from dairy, you are left with a lot of dairy sugar, lactose. Nature would not package something “bad” with something good just for us to wait thousands of years for scientists to learn how to separate the fat out of dairy.

Pasture-raised Eggs

Eggs do contain cholesterol and fat, and the reality is that we need both. Both are in every cell of the human body. Cholesterol supports brain function, serotonin production, and it acts as an antioxidant. Your heart gets 60% of its energy from fat and you brain is mostly fat.

Egg Whites/ Egg Substitutes/ Non-Pasture-raised Eggs

Nature did not package something good for us with something bad for us just to wait thousands of years for humans to invent egg-beaters. You are what you eat, so if you’re eating poorly raised eggs, you are not getting the nutrients that you need.

Health & Hugs <3,

Katie

References:

Axe, J. (2015). Step away from the diet coke. Retrieved from http://draxe.com/step-away-from-the-diet-coke/

Bauman, E. (2014) Foundations of Nutrition. Penngrove, CA: Bauman Press.

Bowden, J. & Sinatra, S. (2012). The Great Cholesterol Myth. Beverly, MA: Fair Winds Press.

Knoff, L (2014) Personal Communication.

Murray, M., Pizzorno, J., & Pizzorno, L. (2005). The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods. New York, NY: Atria Books.

Wolfe, L. (2013). Eat the Yolks. Las Vegas, NV: Victory Belt Publishing.

Dill Pesto Recipe

Dill Pesto Recipe [Paleo, Primal, Vegetarian, GF, 21DSD]

During our travels this summer, we had an amazing dinner in Florence, Italy. The food was so good that we ate lunch AND dinner at Trattoria Il Francescano during the course of one weekend. The salad that I ordered came with pesto sauce on it. This may seem simple, but for me it was revolutionary. I’ve used pesto in soups, on pizza, and on salmon, but never on salad. Since then I’ve been pretty obsessed with making my own basil pesto. Last week at the farmers market, Tomatero had huge bunches of fresh dill. I only needed a little for my salmon dinner that night, so rather than let the herb go to waste, I decided to make Dill Pesto. Result = AMAZING. I have these cool little herb freezer storage containers that allow me to save the extra. Highly recommended!

 

Recipe:

2 small bunches of dill

1/3 cup pine nuts

1 lemon, juiced

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

1 tsp. Simply Organic garlic sea salt

1 tsp. Simply Organic lemon pepper 

Directions:

  1. Rinse the dill and trim the ends off.
  2. Add all ingredients to food processor and pulse until combined. A blender could be used instead.
  3. Serve on salads, veggies, or on salmon. Enjoy!

Olive Oil is a great source of omega-9 fatty acids, copper, iron, and vitamin E. Olive oil has been shown to help manage and prevent cardiovascular disease, asthma, arthritis, cancer, and blood sugar disregulation. It also helps to lower inflammation.

Dill is a member of the Umbelliferae family which includes, carrots, celery, parsley, and fennel. Dill has been shown to reduce flatulence and digestive ailments. It also has antimicrobial and anticancer effects. It helps the liver in detoxification. Dill is also a known sleep aid. In addition to its phytonutrients, it is rich in vitamins A and C and manganese and potassium.

Pine Nuts are a good source of protein – more than any other nut or seed! They are a good source of vitamins B1, B2, B3, and E and manganese, copper, magnesium, molybdenum, zinc, and potassium.

Sources:

Murray, M., Pizzorno, J., & Pizzorno, L. (2005). The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods. New York, NY: Atria Books.

World’s Healthiest Foods. (November 8, 2015) Retrieved from: http://whfoods.com/index.php

In Season, in October

October is finally here! I love PUMPKINS more than just about anything, so I am a excited that October is upon us. I’m not a PSL (pumpkin spice latte) girl, actually I don’t even drink coffee. I don’t like artificially flavored things, so even if I drank coffee, you couldn’t get me near it (no judgements if you are a PSL person)! With that said I do love to bake and cook with pumpkin puree. My other favorite on this list is butternut squash. I’ll be posting my favorite butternut squash soup recipe soon. Keep your eyes peeled! What’s your favorite thing on the list?

Hugs & Health (and Pumpkins too!) <3

Katie

This image comes from a poster made in San Fransisco by an artist collective called This is YA.

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The 52 New Foods Challenge – Lavender

This week’s food is LAVENDER! While I really do love lavender (Just ask my husband, Jim) I don’t eat it very often.  Jennifer Tyler Lee suggests making lavender infused drinks – which sound absolutely divine! I have become quite famous on our Annual Cookie Bake Off for making lavender shortbread, which is quite spectacular. Have you tried cooking with lavender?

Facts

  • Lavender is very relaxing – it can help with sleep and it can relieve headaches
  • Lavender oil can be used to treat burns, heal rashes, and as a natural insect repellant
  • It is anti-bacterial
  • Bees love lavender! This is great because we need more honeybees (they are an at-risk species).

Lavender

From The 52 New Food Challenge by Jennifer Tyler Lee

In Season, in Novemeber

A new month is here and with it comes new fruits and veggies.  My favorite item on this list is Brussels sprouts. I could eat them nearly everyday. My other favorites on this list are Pears, Winter Squash, and Radishes. I love roasting radishes with butter – they taste just like roasted new potatoes (a great alternative for those avoiding nightshades!).  What’s your favorite thing on the list?

Hugs & Health <3

Katie

This image comes from a poster made in San Fransisco by an artist collective called This is YA.

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