Mexican Style Coleslaw

Weekly shopping trips to the farmer’s market are my inspiration for the week’s menu. Some people plan their meals around what’s on their shopping list, but I go to the farmer’s market to see what produce is in season and let that guide my weekly meal planning. Then I head to grocery store to pick up whatever else I need for the week’s meals. I realize this may seem backwards to many, but eating seasonally is my thing, so you’re probably not too surprised! 😉

This past week, there were the cutest little heads of cabbage for one dollar each. I decided coleslaw would make a great accompaniment to the Mustard Glazed Chicken Thighs from The 21-Day Sugar Detox: Bust Sugar & Carb Cravings Naturally.

I always make my own paleo mayonnaise, but I remembered that I recently got a free jar of Primal Kitchen Chipotle Lime Avocado Mayo from Thrive Market. I was feeling a bit lazy and not wanting to make my own mayo, especially when I had a perfectly good paleo mayo on hand. I decided I would “make it work”.  Then I had a lightbulb moment: what if I made a coleslaw that had a Mexican flare to it? And thus Mexican style coleslaw was born. This coleslaw was much, much better than simply “making it work”. I have made this huge batch of coleslaw 3 times in the span of one week. My husband looks at me with a big goofy grin when he eats it, because it is just that good. It was also a HUGE hit at our Father’s Day picnic at the winery. I hope you enjoy it as much as we did!

 

Mexican Style Coleslaw

cleaneatingwithkatie
This coleslaw is so tasty and makes a great side dish at summer BBQs. It makes a LOT, be prepared to share!
Prep Time 40 mins
Course Salad, Side Dish
Cuisine Mexican
Servings 10 people

Equipment

  • Cuisinart Food Processor

Ingredients
  

Coleslaw Ingredients

  • 1 small purple cabbage thinly sliced
  • 1 small green cabbage thinly sliced
  • 6 celery stalks thinly sliced
  • 6 med carrots grated
  • 1 small jicama peeled & grated
  • 1 med yellow onion grated
  • 1 cup Primal Kitchen Chipotle Lime Mayo
  • ½ cup apple cider vinegar
  • ¼ cup dijion mustard
  • ¼ cup raw local honey
  • 1 lemon zest and juice
  • 2 tbsp chives, minced optional garnish
  • 2 tbsp cilantro, chiffonade optional garnish

Spice Blend

  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 2 tsp garlic sea salt
  • fresh ground pepper to taste

Instructions
 

  • I prefer using a food processor with the slicer attachment to slice my veggies and using the grater attachment to grate my veggies. It makes making a big batch of coleslaw that much easier. But feel free to slice and grate your veggies with whatever tools you have on hand. You can also opt to buy pre-slice and/or pre-grated veggies.
  • In a large bowl, mix all the veggie ingredients (reserve the cilantro and/or chives for garnish).
  • In a small bowl, whisk mayo, vinegar, mustard, honey, and herbs and spices. Add the lemon zest.
  • Stir the dressing onto the coleslaw and top with chives and/or cilantro
Keyword coleslaw, salad

Paleo Chili

Chili is one of my favorite dishes. It’s hearty, it’s warming, it’s tasty, I feel like ya just can’t go wrong with chili. In my vegetarian days I made chili and the recipe easily adapted once I began eating meat and the recipe adapted once again when I started avoiding beans (due to the type of fiber in them that can irritate people with SIBO and other GI problems). Here is my current recipe, but it gets tweaked often.

Paleo Chili

cleaneatingwithkatie
Chili tops my list of all time favorite and easy meals to make. It's honestly hard to screw it up! This recipe can be adapted to use any type of ground meat. We often use bison and it provides a great flavor. If you tolerate beans, feel free to add a can or two of kidney beans (or homemade equivalent).
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 1 hr
Course Main Course, Soup
Cuisine American
Servings 6 people

Ingredients
  

Chili Ingredients

  • 24 oz bone broth chicken, turkey, or beef
  • 16 oz diced tomatoes
  • 1 med onion diced
  • 4 med carrots diced
  • 4 celery stalks diced
  • 4 cloves garlic diced
  • 2 tbsp grass-fed butter
  • 2 lbs ground bison pasture-raised
  • 2 tbsp fresh sprouts optional garnish
  • 1 tbsp grass-fed sour cream optional garnish (per serving)
  • ½ avocado optional garnish (per serving)

Spice Blend

  • 1 tbsp coriander
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tbsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • sea salt to taste
  • fresh ground pepper to taste

Instructions
 

  • In a stock pot, sauté onions and garlic in butter until translucent.
  • Add bone broth, tomatoes, remaining veggies, spices, and bison. (If you're adding beans, add them in during this step.)
  • Bring to a boil and then reduce to simmer. Continue on a low simmer for 45 min.
  • Top with avocado, sprouts, and sour cream (if using). Serve immediately and enjoy!
Keyword chili, paleo, paleo chili, soup

Tomatoes are rich sources of vitamins C & K, carotenes (especially lycopene), biotin and fiber. They are protective against cancer and should be eaten with an oil to improve absorption.

Celery is helpful in preventing cancer, improves white blood cell activity, and helps to lower blood pressure. It is rich in potassium and sodium. It helps the liver to detoxify as well.

Onions are a member of the allium (lily) family and are related to garlic & leeks. Alliums are known to have a cholesterol reducing effect and are known for their ability to help fight off cold and flu viruses. Onions are rich in antioxidants and biotin, manganese, copper, phosphorous, potassium, vitamins B1, B6, C, and fiber.

Butternut Squash Soup

Butternut squash soup is something that I could eat nearly everyday during the winter months. Hearty, filling, healthy, and delicious. I found a recipe for it about 5 years ago, and since then, I’ve tweaked it to make it my own. I found the act of peeling the butternut squash simply ridiculous. It is insanely hard to peel a raw butternut squash. Then, while in Miami, a friend ordered some butternut squash at a restaurant and it arrived roasted with the skin on. MIND BLOWN. I decided then to stop peeling the squash for these three reasons. 1) It’s way too hard, 2) I’m going to puree the soup with an immersion blender anyways, and 3) the skin is where the nutrients are! So here is my favorite recipe for butternut squash soup. Enjoy!

  1.  

Butternut Squash Soup

cleaneatingwithkatie
Butternut squash soup is one of my favorite fall and winter meals. I usually pair it with a sausage and then I have a balanced meal. Because you don't have to spend time peeling the butternut squash, this recipe is that much sweeter!
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 1 hr
Course Main Course, Soup
Cuisine American
Servings 6 people

Equipment

  • immersion blender (or food processor or blender)

Ingredients
  

Ingredients

  • 1 large butternut squash seeded and coarsely chopped
  • 6 celery stalks diced
  • 6 carrots diced
  • 1 med. onion diced
  • 4 cloves garlic diced
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 tbsp grass-fed butter
  • 2 cups chicken bone broth

Spice Blend

  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp garlic sea salt
  • fresh ground pepper to taste
  • 2 lemons juiced
  • 2 tbsp cilantro optional garnish
  • 1 tbsp grass-fed sour cream optional garnish

Instructions
 

  • Place a vegetable steamer in a large stock pot. Add water, butter, and butternut squash. Steam the butternut squash until pierced easily with a knife.
  • Once steamed, place squash in stock pot (leave water in pot). Add carrots, celery, onions, and garlic. Add broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer. 
  • Add all of the spices. Keep at simmer for about 30 minutes. Remove from heat, and allow to cool for about 15 minutes.
  • Use an immersion blender to purée soup (a regular blender or food processor will also work).  Add lemon juice (don't skip the acid step!). Serve with a dollop of sour cream or plain yogurt and garnish with cilantro.
Keyword butternut squash soup, paleo, soup

Onions are a good source of vitamins C and B6, potassium, and manganese. They are also rich in antioxidants, particularly quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin, which all play a role in cancer prevention. Onions also help to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.

Carrots are good sources of vitamins A, C, B6 & K, biotin, potassium, thiamine, and fiber. They are also rich in antioxidants and good source of starchy carbohydrates.

Butternut Squash is a good source of antioxidant carotenoids, vitamins C, B1, B6, folic acid, and pantothenic acid. It is also a good source of potassium, manganese, and fiber. Dark-fleshed winter squash is shown to be protective against cancer, especially lung cancer, heart disease, and and type II diabetes.

Asian Style Turkey Lettuce Wraps

Ever since going paleo a few years ago, we’ve been trying to expand our repertoire of recipes. A colleague suggested lettuce wraps and boom this recipe was born. It’s been tweaked over the years, but here it is in its latest form.

 

Asian Style Turkey Lettuce Wraps

cleaneatingwithkatie
Lettuce Wraps are quick, easy, and a crowd pleaser, need I say more? Feel free to tweak the veggies to add bok choy, mushrooms, or water chestnuts. This recipe will be in your repertoire for sure!
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine Asian
Servings 4 people

Equipment

  • Cuisinart Food Processor (optional)

Ingredients
  

  • 2 lbs pasture-raised ground turkey
  • 5 med carrots tops trimmed
  • 4 celery stalks tops and ends trimmed
  • 1 med. onion outer skin peeled and quartered
  • 10-12 romaine lettuce leaves rinsed and dried
  • 2 tbsp cooking fat ghee, duck fat, butter, etc.
  • 2 tbsp coconut aminos
  • 2 tbsp coconut vinegar or rice vinegar
  • 1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
  • 3 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 tbsp sesame seeds
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • ¼ cup green onions, diced optional garnish

Instructions
 

  • Melt the cooking fat in a skillet over medium heat and add the ground turkey. Brown the meat.
  • While the turkey is browning in the pan, grate the onion, celery, and carrots in a food processor, using the grater blade.
  • Once turkey is nearly all browned, add the coconut aminos, vinegar, ginger, garlic, sesame seeds, and sesame oil. Mix to combine. 
  • Add the grated vegetables and bring to a low simmer until veggies are cooked.
  • Place ground turkey mixture on the romaine lettuce leaves. Garnish with sesame seeds and green onions.
Keyword asian style lettuce wraps, lettuce wraps

Onions are a good source of vitamins C and B6, potassium, and manganese. They are also rich in antioxidants, particularly quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin, which all play a role in cancer prevention. Onions also help to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Quercetin plays a large role in healing the gut.

Carrots are good sources of vitamins A, C, B6 & K, biotin, potassium, thiamine (B1), and fiber. They are also rich in antioxidants and good source of starchy carbohydrates.

Turkey is rich in glutamine, which is an important amino acid for healing the small intestines of those with leaky gut. It is also rich in vitamins B6 and B12, protein, niacin, phosphorous, selenium, zinc, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, iron, potassium, and magnesium.

Ginger has long been used for gastrointestinal problems, making this an ideal food for those with leaky gut and other GI troubles. It relaxes and soothes the intestines and promotes the elimination of gas. It is also anti-inflammatory. Always choose fresh over dried, as it has higher levels of ginger’s active protease.