Pumpkin Seeds

Pumpkin seeds are a great option if you’re missing popcorn or chips, OR if you’re like me, and you just love them. I save all winter squash seeds and follow the same recipe (tweaked only based on quantity of seeds). To get more nutrition from the seeds AND to make easier to digest, soak them overnight in filtered water.

Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

cleaneatingwithkatie
Pumpkin seeds are the unsung hero of pumpkin season. Pumpkin spice everything gets all the attention, but I'm a major fan of pumpkin seeds.
Cook Time 25 mins
Course Snack
Cuisine American

Ingredients
  

  • 2-4 tbsp grass-fed butter
  • pumpkin seeds winter squash seeds work too
  • sea salt
  • garlic powder
  • ground pepper

Instructions
 

  • Soak seeds in filtered water overnight. Drain and clean
  • Preheat oven to 350° F. On a rimmed baking sheet, add seeds, several pats of butter (use your judgement here on butter to seed ratio, and sprinkle with sea salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
  • Since I don't melt the butter beforehand, be sure to mix seeds to make sure that all the seeds are coated with butter or they will burn.
  • Cook for 15-25 minutes. Here's how I really judge them: when the seeds have absorbed the butter and are golden brown. Enjoy!!
Keyword pumpkin seeds, snack, winter squash

Spaghetti Squash and Turkey Meatballs

This recipe is inspired by a spaghetti squash dish I had in Salt Lake City when I attended the Young Living Conference in June of 2017. It was so good and filling that I knew that I needed to recreate my own version at home. Every time I make it, Jim raves about it!

Spaghetti Squash and Turkey Meatballs

cleaneatingwithkatie
I've included the sauce recipe that I use, BUT for a quicker version, my two favorite clean and tasty sauces are Rao's and Otamot. Feel free to substitute. This is a satisfying and hearty winter dish and I think will be a crowd pleaser.
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 50 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 4 people

Equipment

  • jellyroll pan

Ingredients
  

Sauce Ingredients

  • 1 28 oz can diced organic tomatoes
  • 1 7 oz jar organic tomato paste
  • 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • tsp garlic sea salt
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • ½ tsp dried thyme
  • ½ tsp dried parsley
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • 1 bay leaf

Meatballs

  • lbs ground organic turkey
  • 1 tsp garlic sea salt
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • ½ tsp dried thyme
  • ½ tsp dried parsley
  • ½ tsp ground pepper

Other

  • 2 small spaghetti squash
  • 2 tbsp parsley chiffonade optional garnish
  • 2 tbsp shaved parmesan cheese optional garnish

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 350° F. 
  • Cut the top and bottom off of the spaghetti squashes. Then cut in half lengthwise and scoop out seeds. Place squashes flesh side down in a rimmed pan (like a jellyroll pan) with about a 1/4 inch of water. 
  • Bake for 45-55 minutes or until a knife easily pierces the skin. 
  •  Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan over low-medium heat, add the olive oil, diced tomatoes, tomato paste, and all spices. Stir to combine.
  • Allow to come to a low simmer. 
  • In a medium bowl, add the meat and spices. Mix together with your hands until spices are well distributed throughout the meat. 
  • Form the meat into eight evenly-sized meat balls. Place meatballs in the sauce to cook.
  • When the spaghetti squash is cooked, remove from oven and allow to cool. Once cool, use a fork to loosen the flesh from the skin. Keep the flesh in the skin to allow for a "bowl" in which to serve the squash, sauce, and meatballs.
  • Cook meatballs in sauce turning over after about 25 minutes. Cook for about 20 additional minutes, or until meat is done in the center. 
  • To serve, place one half of the spaghetti squash in a bowl. Top with meatballs, sauce, fresh parsley, and shaved parmesan.
Keyword grain-free spaghetti, spaghetti squash, stuffed squash

Grain-Free Pumpkin Cookies

This recipe is inspired by a pumpkin cookie recipe that I fell in love with years ago. I remember thinking, who needs pumpkin pie if you have these cookies. I know -very controversial, but I still stand by that statement today – 100%. In this recipe, I swap out white flour for “Paleo” flours, regular sugars for low-glycemic sugars/less processed sugars, and I use grass-fed butter.

 

Grain-Free Pumpkin Cookies with Ginger Cream Cheese Frosting

Grain-Free Pumpkin Cookies

cleaneatingwithkatie
This recipe is inspired by a delectable gluten-full pumpkin cookie recipe. It took a lot of tweaks to make a delish grain-free version. I also include two "frosting" options – dairy and dairy-free.
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 24 mins
Course cookies, Dessert
Cuisine American
Servings 10 people

Equipment

  • Med. cookie scooper ~2 tbsp

Ingredients
  

  • 1 cup Otto's Cassava Flour
  • ¾ cup tapioca starch
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 2 tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • 1 cup coconut sugar
  • ½ cup maple syrup
  • 2 eggs pasture-raised
  • 1 cup grass-fed butter coconut oil can be subbed for dairy free option
  • cup pumpkin purée
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Ginger Cream Cheese Frosting

  • 3 oz cream cheese organic
  • 4 tbsp grass-fed butter
  • ½ tsp ground ginger
  • 2 cups confectioners sugar
  • ~2 tbsp water

Dairy-Free "Frosting"

  • cinnamon-sugar marshmallows regular marshmallows work well too

Instructions
 

Cookie Recipe:

  • Preheat oven to 350° F. Line a baking sheet with parchment (I use baking stones for cookie baking.)
  • Combine the first six ingredients in a medium bowl. Set aside.
  • Add the butter and coconut sugar to a stand mixer with the paddle attachment. Mix on low-medium until well combined. Add the maple syrup and mix again. Scrape down the sides and add the eggs, pumpkin, and vanilla. Mix on low-medium until well combined. 
  • With the mixer on low, add the dry ingredient mixture a little at a time. Scrape down the sides one more time and mix well. 
  • Using a cookie scooper (I use the medium size from Pampered Chef ~ 2 Tbsp.), drop cookies onto a baking stone or parchment lined cookie sheet, about 2" apart.
  • Bake for 20-24 minutes or until cookies test done when touched in the center. 
  • Cool cookies and frost with one of the following: 

Ginger Cream Cheese Frosting

  • Add the cream cheese, butter, and ginger to mixing bowl and mix on high until light a fluffy. 
  • Half a cup at a time, add the confectioners sugar and mix into the cream cheese and butter mixture. Add water to the mixture and mix until a proper spreading consistency. 
  • Spread a generous layer of frosting on each cookie. 

Cinnamon Sugar Marshmallow "Frosting"

  •  Turn on oven to low broil. 
  • Just before serving your pumpkin cookies, place cookies on a parchment lined cookie sheet (don't skip this – it gets messy). Top with one marshmallow per cookie. 
  • Broil until marshmallow turn golden brown and begin to ooze marshmallow goodness. 
  • Serve immediately. This is such an easy way to "frost" cookies and is my ABSOLUTE NEW FAVORITE frosting. Must try!
Keyword cookies, fall dessert, grain-free cookies, pumpkin, pumpkin cookies
Grain-Free Pumpkin Cookies with Marshmallow “Frosting”

Stuffed Delicata Squash

I’ve been LOVING delicata squash lately and I’ve been seeing people get really creative with how they use it. The more creative they get, the more inspired I get. I decided to try out a simple stuffed delicata squash recipe and when it turned out pretty good, I knew I wanted to step up my game. Here is the result.

Stuffed Delicata Squash

cleaneatingwithkatie
Delicata squash is a new favorite of mine because the skin is edible when roasted meaning there's no need to peel it! Stuffing it with meat and veggies makes for the perfect hearty and filling fall and winter dish.
Prep Time 35 mins
Cook Time 35 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 6 people

Ingredients
  

  • 4 delicata squash choose larger ones that will be easier to stuff
  • 1 lb pasture raised ground pork (other ground meats will also work)
  • ½ med red onion diced
  • 2 med carrots sliced
  • 3 celery stalks sliced
  • 1 12 oz bag of riced cauliflower fresh or frozen
  • 1 tsp coconut oil

Spice Blend Ingredients

  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • ½ tsp fresh ground pepper
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • ½ tsp dried thyme
  • ½ tsp dried parsley
  • ½ tsp granulated garlic
  • ½ tsp granulated onion
  • 2 tbsp parsley chiffonade optional garnish

Instructions
 

  • Pre-heat oven to 350° F and coat a rimmed baking sheet with coconut oil. 
  • Slice the delicata squash into 2 inch rounds and scoop out the seeds. Place on the coconut oil coated baking sheet and put in the oven to par-bake for 10 minutes. 
  • While the squash is par-baking, combine the ground pork, riced cauliflower, celery, onions, and carrots in a large bowl. Mix in the spices and stir well.
  • After 10 minutes, take the par-baked delicata squash out of the oven. Being careful of the hot baking sheet and the hot squash, carefully spoon the pork and veggie mixture into the delicata squash rounds until over stuffed.
  • Continue baking for 25 minutes. When the meat is cooked through and the squash pierces easily with a knife, remove from oven. Allow to cool for 10 minutes before serving. 
  • Sprinkle with parsley chiffonade and serve. 
Keyword ground meat, ground pork, stuffed squash, winter squash

The 52 New Foods Challenge – Butternut Squash

The first time I bought a butternut squash, I had no idea what to do with. I found a recipe in my Clean Food cookbook for roasted butternut squash with almonds and a touch of maple syrup. It was exciting to try new a food and a new recipe and really like it! The next week, at the farmer’s market, I went back for more butternut squash. This time I found a recipe for butternut squash soup. I’ve been hooked ever since! Here’s my favorite Butternut Squash Soup Recipe.

Jennifer Tyler Lee also suggests butternut squash soup and a maple roasted butternut squash. Yum!

Food Facts:

  • Member of the cucurbitaceae family.
  • Because of the thick skin, winter squashes, like butternut squash, can last in cold storage for up to six months.
  • The deep orange coloring is a sign that it contains high levels of beta-carotene, a vitamin A precursor.
  • Of all the winter squashes, pumpkin contains the most beta-carotene.
  • Foods rich in carotenoids, like beta-carotene have been shown to be protective against many cancers, especially lung cancer.
  • Carotenoid rich food is also protective against heart disease and the development of type 2 diabetes.
  • Good source of fiber.
  • Good source of vitamins B1, B5, B6, and C, and folic acid, niacin, potassium, and manganese.

Sources:
Encyclopedia of Healing Foods by Michael Murray, Joseph Pizzorno, and Lara Pizzorno, Superfoods by Tonia Reinhard, and The 52 New Foods Challenge by Jennifer Tyler Lee.

 

 

The 52 New Foods Challenge – Pumpkin

It’s not surprising that I love pumpkin, it seems like most people do. However, I’m not a fan of pumpkin flavoring. I’ll be honest, that stuff is crap, and I avoid crap like the plague. So that means no Pumpkin Spice Latte or any of the other pumpkin flavored BS out there in the stores. I know, some of you are probably hating me right now. You’re entitled to your love of whatever you want, but just be real with yourself as to what’s in it and what effect it has on your body.

I like pumpkin savory dishes as well as pumpkin sweet things. We had the MOST EPIC pumpkin and seafood soup on our Honeymoon in Puerto Rico. I have made a few attempts to recreate the soup, but haven’t been able to do so. I LOVE pumpkin curry from Jasmine Thai, our local joint. My favorite sweet pumpkin treat surprisingly isn’t pumpkin pie. I KNOW! I have a recipe for pumpkin cookies that is AMAZING! So bread-like and scrumdiddlyumptious. I’m in the process of trying to paleo-ify the recipe. STAY TUNED!

Jennifer Tyler Lee recommends pumpkin bread, pumpkin pie with a ginger spiced crust, and roasted pumpkin seeds with two different flavor profiles. I should also say I’m a huge sucker for homemade pumpkin seeds. It’s like crack to me.

Food Facts:

  • Member of the cucurbitaceae family.
  • Because of the thick skin, winter squashes, like pumpkin, can last in cold storage for up to six months.
  • The deep orange coloring is a sign that it contains high levels of beta-carotene, a vitamin A precursor.
  • Of all the winter squashes, pumpkin contains the most beta-carotene.
  • Foods rich in carotenoids, like beta-carotene have been shown to be protective against many cancers, especially lung cancer.
  • Carotenoid rich food is also protective against heart disease and the development of type 2 diabetes.
  • Good source of fiber.
  • Good source of vitamins B1, B5, B6, and C, and folic acid, niacin, potassium, and manganese.
  • Pumpkin has been shown to enhance immune activity in rodent studies.

Sources:

The 52 New Foods Challenge by Jennifer Tyler Lee, Superfoods by Tonia Reinhard, and Encyclopedia of Healing Foods by Michael Murray, Joseph Pizzorno, and Lara Pizzorno.

 

Butternut Squash Soup

Butternut squash soup is something that I could eat nearly everyday during the winter months. Hearty, filling, healthy, and delicious. I found a recipe for it about 5 years ago, and since then, I’ve tweaked it to make it my own. I found the act of peeling the butternut squash simply ridiculous. It is insanely hard to peel a raw butternut squash. Then, while in Miami, a friend ordered some butternut squash at a restaurant and it arrived roasted with the skin on. MIND BLOWN. I decided then to stop peeling the squash for these three reasons. 1) It’s way too hard, 2) I’m going to puree the soup with an immersion blender anyways, and 3) the skin is where the nutrients are! So here is my favorite recipe for butternut squash soup. Enjoy!

  1.  

Butternut Squash Soup

cleaneatingwithkatie
Butternut squash soup is one of my favorite fall and winter meals. I usually pair it with a sausage and then I have a balanced meal. Because you don't have to spend time peeling the butternut squash, this recipe is that much sweeter!
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 1 hr
Course Main Course, Soup
Cuisine American
Servings 6 people

Equipment

  • immersion blender (or food processor or blender)

Ingredients
  

Ingredients

  • 1 large butternut squash seeded and coarsely chopped
  • 6 celery stalks diced
  • 6 carrots diced
  • 1 med. onion diced
  • 4 cloves garlic diced
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 tbsp grass-fed butter
  • 2 cups chicken bone broth

Spice Blend

  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp garlic sea salt
  • fresh ground pepper to taste
  • 2 lemons juiced
  • 2 tbsp cilantro optional garnish
  • 1 tbsp grass-fed sour cream optional garnish

Instructions
 

  • Place a vegetable steamer in a large stock pot. Add water, butter, and butternut squash. Steam the butternut squash until pierced easily with a knife.
  • Once steamed, place squash in stock pot (leave water in pot). Add carrots, celery, onions, and garlic. Add broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer. 
  • Add all of the spices. Keep at simmer for about 30 minutes. Remove from heat, and allow to cool for about 15 minutes.
  • Use an immersion blender to purée soup (a regular blender or food processor will also work).  Add lemon juice (don't skip the acid step!). Serve with a dollop of sour cream or plain yogurt and garnish with cilantro.
Keyword butternut squash soup, paleo, soup

Onions are a good source of vitamins C and B6, potassium, and manganese. They are also rich in antioxidants, particularly quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin, which all play a role in cancer prevention. Onions also help to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.

Carrots are good sources of vitamins A, C, B6 & K, biotin, potassium, thiamine, and fiber. They are also rich in antioxidants and good source of starchy carbohydrates.

Butternut Squash is a good source of antioxidant carotenoids, vitamins C, B1, B6, folic acid, and pantothenic acid. It is also a good source of potassium, manganese, and fiber. Dark-fleshed winter squash is shown to be protective against cancer, especially lung cancer, heart disease, and and type II diabetes.

In Season, in December

It’s December first (not quite sure how that happened!!)! Here is the list of what’s in season in December (especially in Northern California). Mandarins are exciting to see on this list. And I’m excited to have lemons back on my tree!! 

What seasonal produce are you excited for?

 

Health & Hugs <3,

Katie

In Season, in October

October is finally here! I love PUMPKINS more than just about anything, so I am a excited that October is upon us. I’m not a PSL (pumpkin spice latte) girl, actually I don’t even drink coffee. I don’t like artificially flavored things, so even if I drank coffee, you couldn’t get me near it (no judgements if you are a PSL person)! With that said I do love to bake and cook with pumpkin puree. 

My other favorite on this list is butternut squash. I’ll be posting my favorite butternut squash soup recipe soon. Keep your eyes peeled! What’s your favorite thing on the list?

Hugs & Health (and Pumpkins too!) <3

Katie

 

 

In Season, in November

A new month is here and with it comes new fruits and veggies.  My favorite item on this list is Brussels sprouts. I could eat them nearly everyday. My other favorites on this list are Pears, Winter Squash, and Radishes.

I love roasting radishes with butter – they taste just like roasted new potatoes (a great alternative for those avoiding nightshades!).  What’s your favorite thing on the list?

Hugs & Health <3

Katie