Life After the Detox Meal Plan

So you’ve completed The 21 Day Sugar Detox and now, like a little birdie ready to try out her new wings, you’re ready to launch yourself back into the big wide world of food choices.

For many, day 22 is exciting! I CAN HAVE ALL THE THINGS! While for others, it’s daunting! WHAT AM I GOING TO EAT????? As a Certified 21DSD Coach for three years, I can tell you that having all the things will ruin all.your.progress. I always recommend that clients find their new normal. They experiment with reintroducing the NO foods one at a time to find out how they tolerate each food and then you start to learn the DIET OF YOU. Each of us has one, it’s made up of the foods that we enjoy AND tolerate well. It will be different for everyone and possibly for different periods of your life.

While you are working to find the DIET OF YOU, here is a FREE real food meal plan. It’s a little less restrictive than the 21DSD, but it’s still more restrictive than the SAD (Standard American Diet) that most of us have been on our whole lives.

I hope you enjoy the meal plan. Let me know in the comments below!

In health, Katie

Clean Beauty in the Press

When I switched to Safer Skincare with Beautycounter, it was extremely helpful to have articles about skincare, cosmetics, and the beauty industry to reference. These articles help to validate the Safer Skincare and Beauty movement, whether or not you choose to purchase Beautycounter or not.

Here are some resources for you as you embark on your Safer Skincare journey. Click on each image to load the full article or resource.

The New York Times: Do You Know What’s in Your Cosmetics?

6 Super Popular Beautycounter Products You Should Consider Buying from your Facebook Friends

Sperm Count Zero

The New York Times: Are Your Sperm in Trouble?

Clean Beauty Can be a Dirty Business: Beautycounter, Sephora And P&G are Changing That

Glossy: Beautycounter Carves Out a Niche in Clean Skin Care for Men

WWD: Men Have More Grooming Options Than Ever

Opportunity Call with Beautycounter CEO Gregg Renfrew

Beautycounter: Most Innovative Company

#CleanBeauty Segment on the Today Show

Why Beautycounter is the #1 Trending Beauty Brand in 2018

California Strengthens Labeling Requirements for Professional Cosmetics

How to Support the Beautycounter Mission

One way to support the work that Beautycounter is doing to pave the way for Safer Skincare for everyone is to shop Beautycounter.

 

 

 

 

Another way to not only support the work that Beautycounter is doing, but also to get rewarded yourself, is to join our Band Of Beauty Membership.

You can also host a Beautycounter Social. This is a simple way to share safer skincare with your friends and family. Host Rewards

We would also love to have your voice in our movement in Washington.

TEXT "BETTERBEAUTY" TO 52886 TO ASK CONGRESS TO ACT!

Or Join our team!

My Favorite Beautycounter Picks

I started using Beautycounter about a year and a half ago (spring 2017). My first favorites were:

  

 

Now that I’ve tried more of the products, I have some new favorites to add to my list of old favorites:

 

 

 

Want to learn more about New and Old Beautycounter Favorites? Join my monthly Safer Skincare Newsletter.

Self-Care Bingo

The topic of self-care has come up quite a bit lately in my social media circles. I’ve even wrote about it here. There’s a lot of debate as to what exactly is self-care and what is not self-care, how expensive self-care should or shouldn’t be, and the like. I guess I find myself squarely in the “you do your self-care” camp. To me this means, if what you’re calling self-care nourishes your body, mind, and/or your spirit, then it’s self-care for you. It might not necessarily float my self-care boat, but that doesn’t actually matter.

Self-Care Bingo – social

If you’ve been following along on Instagram for a while, you know that I like to find quotes and images on Sundays (I mean,  hashtag self-care Sunday, after all!) of what self-care might include for you and me. For me, it’s often a pretty broad term, it can include pampering activities like massages and DIY facials, social activities like spending time with friends, family, and fur-babies, or even solo time activities like reading, sleeping, and being creative. There is no one perfect list of self-care ideas. I think self-care may evolve during one’s lifetime and what might be self-care for you now, may not nourish your body, mind, or soul in the future.

I’ve put together a list of self-care ideas that I currently enjoy. Oddly enough, almost everything on this list is FREE or can be low-cost. I didn’t set out to create a list of free self-care ideas, but when I was generating

my current favorites, this is the result. It almost seems like an interesting psychological experiment that just highlighted that I value the free things in life more than money. OR am I just reading into this too much?

Feel free to download Self Care Bingo  and share like crazy.

What’s your favorite self-care?

What’s this grain-free hype all about?

Many folks are embracing a grain free lifestyle these days and it’s not just trendy. All plants, grains included, are programmed with species protective mechanisms so that animals and humans do not eat them into extinction. Animals also have species protective mechanisms like, running away, swimming away, and defending themselves and their young. Since plants can’t do that, they have a tiny amount of toxins in them. The more you eat of one type of plant, the more of that toxin that gets built up in your body. (Here’s another reason for eating a wide variety of fruits and vegetables and for following a seasonal model of eating.) 

Further, the seeds of the plant (i.e. the plant’s baby) often have the highest concentration of the those toxins in order to protect the next generation of plants. When we eat grains, we are eating the seeds of the plant. Those toxins are called antinutrients. They are substances that “steal” nutrients from the body and irritate the gut, cause inflammation in the body, and cause nutrient deficiency. Some examples are: phytates, lectins, saponins, and oxalates.

Phytates:

  • deplete magnesium and zinc and inhibit their absorption
  • are found in unsoaked grains, legumes, and seeds
  • good gut flora helps to aid in mineral absorption and minimize the impact of phytates
  • are better tolerated when consumed with fermented foods and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) a type of fiber the body can’t digest and that feeds the good gut bacteria

Oxalates:

  • deplete magnesium and zinc and inhibit their absorption
  • good gut flora help to aid in mineral absorption and minimize the impact of oxalates
  • are found in greens like spinach, beet greens, chard, purslane, and parsley
  • impact the bioavailability of zinc
  • contribute to kidney stones

Lectins:

  • are sugar binding substances that can lead to poor digestion
  • humans have trouble digesting them and thus can develop antibodies
  • can cause flatulence
  • can damage the gut (leaky gut)
  • are found in grains, legumes, dairy products

Saponins:

  • are phytochemicals that are found in food (plant glycosides)
  • break down the gut lining
  • produce a soap like residue and lather
  • are found in quinoa, root beer, beans, potato skins, peanuts, and soy

So how does one avoid antinutrients?

  1. A grain-free lifestyle is one option. Eating less grains or eliminating them altogether is one option.
  2. Opting for white rice instead of brown rice will lower the exposure to antinutrients. White rice has the bran and germ removed, which also removes the antinutrients, making it more digestible for many folks. While brown rice certainly has more nutrients, fiber, and antioxidants, those are of no use to you if you are having trouble digesting and absorbing them because of the antinutrients.
  3. Soaking and sprouting your seeds, legumes, and grains is another great way to reduce the exposure to antinutrients and help to make the nutrients more bioavailable to the body (aka easy to absorb). Here is a great article on how to soak and sprout.
  4. If you’re looking for a shortcut, there are a few brands that sell soaked and sprouted products:

Go Raw sells snacks make of soaked and sprouted nuts and seeds. They are also a small local company that uses real food ingredients and not much sugar!

truRoots  sells a line of grain medleys that have been soaked and sprouted and are convenient and ready to use at home.

 

So, what are your thoughts on going grain-free and antinutrients? Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

 

 

Managing Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes is “the single biggest global health epidemic of our time” (Hyman, 2012, p. 7). It contributes to many other health problems including retinopathy, kidney disease, gastroparesis, neuropathy, heart disease, cancer, dementia, and more. Managing blood sugar is a key to avoiding diabetes and the health problems that accompany it.

Glycemic Index 

The glycemic index (GI) is a way of measuring how quickly foods raise blood sugar (Cohen, 2010). Foods that are more slowly digested raise the blood sugar slowly, while foods that are quickly digested raise the blood sugar more quickly. The higher the number on the GI, the more that blood sugar will be increased. For those with Diabetes, managing blood sugar is key to managing Diabetes.

Glycemic Load

Glycemic load takes the glycemic index of the food and couples that information with the amount of that food, giving a more accurate prediction of how the blood sugar will respond. Glycemic load is considered to be a better tool when deciding what foods one should eat to manage blood sugar.

Glycemic Load and Glycemic Index

Food Serving Glycemic Load Glycemic Index
White bread 1 slice 10 70
Corn flakes 1 cup 21 81
Spelt Bread 1 slice 12 63
Rye Bread 1 slice 5 41
White rice 1 cup 23 64
Brown rice 1 cup 18 55
Baked Potato 1 medium 18 60
Sweet Potato 1 medium 11 25
Shredded Wheat 1 cup 17 83
Skim Milk 8 oz. 4 32
Oatmeal 1 cup 15 55
Banana 1 medium 11 42
Carrots, raw 3 oz. 1 16
Cashews 1 oz. 2 22
Lentils 1 cup 5 29
Pearl Barley 1 cup 11 25
Spaghetti 1 cup 23 48
Apple 1 medium 6 38
Orange 1 medium 5 42
Sucrose 2 tsp. 7 68

References:

Bauman, E. & Friedlander, J. (2014). Therapeutic Nutrition. Penngrove, CA: Bauman College.Bauman, E. (4/10/15). Personal Communication
Cohen, S. (2010). Diabetes without Drugs. Emmaus, PA: Rodale, Inc.Hyman, M. (2012). The Blood Sugar Solution. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company.