What’s this grain-free hype all about?

Many folks are embracing a grain free lifestyle these days and it’s not just trendy. All plants, grains included, are programmed with species protective mechanisms so that animals and humans do not eat them into extinction. Animals also have species protective mechanisms like, running away, swimming away, and defending themselves and their young. Since plants can’t do that, they have a tiny amount of toxins in them. The more you eat of one type of plant, the more of that toxin that gets built up in your body. (Here’s another reason for eating a wide variety of fruits and vegetables and for following a seasonal model of eating.) 

Further, the seeds of the plant (i.e. the plant’s baby) often have the highest concentration of the those toxins in order to protect the next generation of plants. When we eat grains, we are eating the seeds of the plant. Those toxins are called antinutrients. They are substances that “steal” nutrients from the body and irritate the gut, cause inflammation in the body, and cause nutrient deficiency. Some examples are: phytates, lectins, saponins, and oxalates.

Phytates:

  • deplete magnesium and zinc and inhibit their absorption
  • are found in unsoaked grains, legumes, and seeds
  • good gut flora helps to aid in mineral absorption and minimize the impact of phytates
  • are better tolerated when consumed with fermented foods and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) a type of fiber the body can’t digest and that feeds the good gut bacteria

Oxalates:

  • deplete magnesium and zinc and inhibit their absorption
  • good gut flora help to aid in mineral absorption and minimize the impact of oxalates
  • are found in greens like spinach, beet greens, chard, purslane, and parsley
  • impact the bioavailability of zinc
  • contribute to kidney stones

Lectins:

  • are sugar binding substances that can lead to poor digestion
  • humans have trouble digesting them and thus can develop antibodies
  • can cause flatulence
  • can damage the gut (leaky gut)
  • are found in grains, legumes, dairy products

Saponins:

  • are phytochemicals that are found in food (plant glycosides)
  • break down the gut lining
  • produce a soap like residue and lather
  • are found in quinoa, root beer, beans, potato skins, peanuts, and soy

So how does one avoid antinutrients?

  1. A grain-free lifestyle is one option. Eating less grains or eliminating them altogether is one option.
  2. Opting for white rice instead of brown rice will lower the exposure to antinutrients. White rice has the bran and germ removed, which also removes the antinutrients, making it more digestible for many folks. While brown rice certainly has more nutrients, fiber, and antioxidants, those are of no use to you if you are having trouble digesting and absorbing them because of the antinutrients.
  3. Soaking and sprouting your seeds, legumes, and grains is another great way to reduce the exposure to antinutrients and help to make the nutrients more bioavailable to the body (aka easy to absorb). Here is a great article on how to soak and sprout.
  4. If you’re looking for a shortcut, there are a few brands that sell soaked and sprouted products:

Go Raw sells snacks make of soaked and sprouted nuts and seeds. They are also a small local company that uses real food ingredients and not much sugar!

truRoots  sells a line of grain medleys that have been soaked and sprouted and are convenient and ready to use at home.

 

So, what are your thoughts on going grain-free and antinutrients? Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

 

 

Managing Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes is “the single biggest global health epidemic of our time” (Hyman, 2012, p. 7). It contributes to many other health problems including retinopathy, kidney disease, gastroparesis, neuropathy, heart disease, cancer, dementia, and more. Managing blood sugar is a key to avoiding diabetes and the health problems that accompany it.

Glycemic Index 

The glycemic index (GI) is a way of measuring how quickly foods raise blood sugar (Cohen, 2010). Foods that are more slowly digested raise the blood sugar slowly, while foods that are quickly digested raise the blood sugar more quickly. The higher the number on the GI, the more that blood sugar will be increased. For those with Diabetes, managing blood sugar is key to managing Diabetes.

Glycemic Load

Glycemic load takes the glycemic index of the food and couples that information with the amount of that food, giving a more accurate prediction of how the blood sugar will respond. Glycemic load is considered to be a better tool when deciding what foods one should eat to manage blood sugar.

Glycemic Load and Glycemic Index

Food Serving Glycemic Load Glycemic Index
White bread 1 slice 10 70
Corn flakes 1 cup 21 81
Spelt Bread 1 slice 12 63
Rye Bread 1 slice 5 41
White rice 1 cup 23 64
Brown rice 1 cup 18 55
Baked Potato 1 medium 18 60
Sweet Potato 1 medium 11 25
Shredded Wheat 1 cup 17 83
Skim Milk 8 oz. 4 32
Oatmeal 1 cup 15 55
Banana 1 medium 11 42
Carrots, raw 3 oz. 1 16
Cashews 1 oz. 2 22
Lentils 1 cup 5 29
Pearl Barley 1 cup 11 25
Spaghetti 1 cup 23 48
Apple 1 medium 6 38
Orange 1 medium 5 42
Sucrose 2 tsp. 7 68

References:

Bauman, E. & Friedlander, J. (2014). Therapeutic Nutrition. Penngrove, CA: Bauman College.Bauman, E. (4/10/15). Personal Communication
Cohen, S. (2010). Diabetes without Drugs. Emmaus, PA: Rodale, Inc.Hyman, M. (2012). The Blood Sugar Solution. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company.

Life After the Detox Packages

Q: What is the Life After the Detox package?

A: You’ve completed the detox and you’ve made PROGRESS! But you’re not sure how you can go back into everyday life without eating ALL THE THINGS.

That’s where Life After the Detox comes in! The goal of this program is to be the bridge from Detox life into Life After the Detox.

Q: How can it help me?

A: Many people simply aren’t ready to “go it alone” after the detox and still have goals that they are working toward. We will discuss your goals in a Wellness Vision session and make a plan for the next six to eight weeks (depending if you are an online or in-person participant). We will take another trip to Whole Foods to find foods that can help bridge Detox life to Life After the Detox. I’ll analyze your current diet and and make recommendations for your Life After the Detox. We’ll have a potluck with meals that fit our Life After the Detox goals (in-person only).

 

Q: Do I have to buy a bunch of stuff (supplements, meal replacement shakes, bars, etc.)? 

A: Nope. You’ll still just be buying real food.

Q: What do I need to buy?

A: Besides my coaching fee, you don’t need to buy anything. Practical Paleo and some food samples are included in the fee.

Q: How much is the Life After the Detox package?

  • Online price: $149 per person
  • Local in-person group: $199

Q: What’s the difference between the In-Person group and the Online group?

Online Group In-Person Group
Practical Paleo
Access to our Private Facebook Group
Access to my Expertise as a Nutrition Consultant
Motivation
Accountability Partner
Daily Educational Detox Videos
Three conference calls:

  • Wellness Vision
  • Life After the Detox – what can I eat now?
  • Diet Analysis and Recommendations
Four In-Person Sessions:

  • Wellness Vision
  • Life After the Detox Whole Foods  Shopping “field trip”
  • Life After the Detox Meal Swap/Potluck
  • Diet Analysis and Recommendations
Life After the Detox Swag Bag

  • Filled with Foods to help you ease back into everyday life
Cost $149 $199

 

Quick & Easy Deviled Eggs

This is quite possibly the easiest deviled eggs that you’ll ever make. I had a dinner gathering to attend and completely forgot that I said I’d bring an appetizer. We had basically ZERO food in the fridge, but we did have eggs, Primal Kitchen Chipotle Lime Mayo, a lime, and cilantro. So I decided to give it a go! My uncle raved about these deviled eggs, so I knew they were good enough to make again for Christmas Eve dinner at a friend’s house. There were already deviled eggs at the party, (OOPS!) but mine flew off the platter. Needless to say, I knew I needed to blog about this recipe.

I would love to know your thoughts!

Recipe:

6 eggs, hardboiled

1/4 cup Primal Kitchen Chipotle Lime Mayo

half of 1 lime, juiced

1 tsp. sea salt

paprika, for garnish

12 cilantro leaves , for garnish

Maldon sea salt (optional), for garnish

Directions:

  1. If you have an Instant Pot, you *need* to hard boil your eggs with it. Even farm fresh eggs peel like butter. Add 1 cup of water to the IP. Place 6 eggs in the IP on the removable rack or in a steamer basket. Using the Manual feature and the + / – button to adjust to 7 minutes. (I have found that 7 minutes is the sweet spot for me, but yours may range from 6-8 minutes). When the IP is done, manually release the pressure and add eggs to an ice bath to stop the eggs from continuing to cook. Peel! If you don’t have an Instant Pot, you should get one! In all seriousness, feel free to hard boil your eggs however you like.
  2. Once the eggs are peeled, halve the eggs. Place the yolks, mayo, sea salt, and lime juice in a bowl. Use an immersion blender to to combine the ingredients until the texture is smooth and creamy.
  3. Spoon the yolk mixture back into the eggs.
  4. Sprinkle with paprika and Maldon sea salt (if using).  Add a cilantro leaf to each deviled egg.
  5. Enjoy!

 

PS – I can’t wait for Primal Kitchen Santa Cruz to open. I imagine they will be rocking some deviled eggs on their menu too. It is estimated to open in April of 2018.

PPS – Oh and the even better news, these are 21 Day Sugar Detox compliant!

 

Five Packable Lunches while on The 21DSD

My favorite Lunch Box (it has freezer packs built right in!)

PackIt Freezable Lunch Bag

 

MONDAY

Smoked salmon and Paleo Gingered Beets. Be sure to check the ingredients, some smoked salmon has sugar in the ingredients. This smoked salmon from Vital Choice is 21DSD compliant.

 

TUESDAY

Jalapeno-dill Tuna Salad from The 21-Day Sugar Detox Cookbook

WEDNESDAY

Turkey, Bacon, and Avocado Lettuce Wraps

Directions:

Layer sliced turkey, bacon slices, and avocado on the inside of romaine lettuce. Top with a drizzle of mustard. Optional: add additional veggies – sprinkle with diced olives, diced tomato, diced onions, pickles, or peppercinis, etc.

I like to make about 3-4 of these depending on how hungry you usually are at lunch time.

THURSDAY

Shrimp and Avocado Salad and a green salad.

Basic Salad Building Rules:

Greens – Choose your base of greens: spinach, kale, mixed greens, romaine, butter lettuce, etc.

Veggies – Add more veg: bell peppers, carrots, beets, cucumbers, artichokes, radishes, avocado, jicama, cabbage, etc.

Fruits – Add some fruit! While on the detox, choose from either apples or grapefruit. After the detox expand your fruit options.

Nuts/Seeds – Add a sprinkling of pumpkin seeds, pecans, almonds, macadamia nuts, etc.

Cheese (optional, levels 1 and 2 of the detox only) – Add some feta, goat cheese, parmesan, or whatever cheese you have on hand.

Salad Dressing – check out this post of my favorite homemade salad dressings.

BOOM! Now you ave an epic salad to go with your shrimp and avocado salad.

FRIDAY

Cobb Salad

 

Katie’s Favorite Homemade Salad Dressings

Balsamic Dressing

3 T balsamic vinegar

1 T Gluten-Free Dijon mustard

5 T extra virgin olive oil

1 T finely chopped fresh basil

Pinch of minced garlic

sea salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Add all ingredients to a mason jar or salad dressing container like this one (OXO Good Grips Salad Dressing Shaker) or this one (Kolder Salad Dressing Bottle, Glass) and shake, shake, shake! Store extra in the fridge. (21DSD Compliant)

 

Apple Cider Italian Vinegar

5 T extra virgin olive oil

4 T apple cider vinegar

1 T Balanced Bites Italian Spice Blend 

Directions:

Add all ingredients to your dressing container and shake, shake, shake. Store extra in the fridge. (21DSD Compliant)

 

Mustard Vinaigrette

3 T raspberry balsamic vinegar

3 T extra virgin Olive Oil

3 T Gluten-Free mustard

sea salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Add all ingredients to your dressing container and shake, shake, shake. Store extra in the fridge. (NOT 21DSD Compliant) **Jim’s most favorite, easy, go-to dressing.

 

Sesame Ginger Vinaigrette

2 T rice wine vinegar

2 T coconut aminos

2 T honey

4 T extra virgin olive oil

1/2 t sesame oil (not toasted)

1 t sesame seeds

2 t fresh grated ginger

Directions:

Add all ingredients to your dressing container and shake, shake, shake. Store extra in the fridge. (NOT 21DSD Compliant)

 

Lemon Garlic Dressing

2 lemons, juiced

4 T extra virgin olive oil

1 t garlic sea salt

1 t lemon pepper

Directions:

Add all ingredients to your dressing container and shake, shake, shake. Store extra in the fridge. (21DSD Compliant) **Katie’s favorite, easy, go-to dressing.