Mar. 2017 Book of the Month – Eat the Yolks

On my first day of nutrition consultant classes at Bauman College, as we were going around and introducing ourselves, one of my classmates had mentioned that Diane Sanfilippo had attended Bauman College and wrote the forward to the book Eat the Yolks. I was still a bit of a newbie in the Paleo/ Nutrition world, at least when it came to “celebrities”, so I hadn’t heard of the book yet, but I added it to my ever growing “to read” list on Goodreads. At some point, I was able to find enough time to read Eat the Yolks by Liz Wolfe, and boy was I glad that I did!

First, Liz is funny! No seriously funny! She has a section titled, “Let’s talk about fat, baby!”. I mean talk about a girl after my own heart. How wouldn’t I love a book with references to 90’s R&B culture!?!? Liz does an amazing job of breaking down the complicated science of nutrition into easy to understand chunks and incorporating humor into it all the while.

She goes over the three macronutrients in DETAIL, dedicating a chapter to each. In the chapter on fat (and therefore cholesterol), she states, “This is me beating a dead horse: Lower cholesterol doesn’t prevent heart disease, because cholesterol doesn’t cause heart disease (Wolfe, 2013, p. 59)”. Wolfe debunks the myth that animal proteins are bad for us in the chapter on protein. She refutes The China Study,  that is often used to argue against the consumption of animal foods.

Then, Wolfe details important nutrients that we can only get from animals. If you’re a vegan, she gets it. I get it. But the science of why we need animals in our diets for optimal nutrition is clear. She goes on to illustrate many of the lies of the nutrition industrial complex. Wolfe teaches that Vitamin A can only be obtained from animals. I know, you’re thinking, wait what?? Hello, um, carrots??  The thing is that plants contain beta-carotene, which is a precursor to vitamin A. As Wolfe explains, “…it can, in some circumstances, through a series of chemical conversions within the human body, be converted into true vitamin A (Wolfe, 2013, p.202)”. There are many more mind-blowing gems like this one throughout this book.

Needless to say, I HIGHLY recommend this book. It’s actually one of the the few books that I recommend to nearly all my private nutrition clients. It’s just THAT GOOD. Oh and it’s on Audible. 😉

 

 

 

The 52 New Foods Challenge – Apples

While Apples are pretty much a staple in most homes in North America, I imagine that there are many varieties that you have yet to try! My grandparents had an apple tree in their backyard and I grew making apple crumbles and apple pies with my grandma. Despite all those apples as a kid,  I did not really like raw apples until I was an adult. Green were too tart for me and red and yellow were always too mealy (I now know that’s because they were OLD – many months out of season). Americans are so used to getting all types of produce year round in super markets, but in reality, those foods are either stored in cold storage for many months, grown in a different climate and shipped in, or grown in a greenhouse.

As an adult, I have come to really like all kinds of pink apples: pink lady, fuji, gala, and honeycrisp. I also only eat apples during apple season and during the very early weeks of cold storage. In Northern California, apple season begins in mid-late July and generally lasts until October. Thus, I  only consume apples from July-December.

Besides eating apples with almond butter, my favorite thing to use apples for is apple pie, any surprises there??? Jennifer Tyler Lee recommends that folks make an apple galette, warm cinnamon apples, or apple chips.

Food Facts:

  • Wild apples have SIGNIFICANTLY more phytonutrients than our domesticated varieties – some wild varieties have up to 475 times more phytonutrients than certain domesticated varieties.
  • If you were to plant the five apple seeds from an apple, you would get FIVE different varieties from those new trees. Once a variety is identified, new trees are grown by grafting (a method that involves cutting off branches from a tree and attaching that branch to a less desirable tree that has been trimmed back). This is known as extreme heterozygosity.
  • Any apple that is less than two inches in diameter is considered a crabapple.
  • Most of our modern apples can be traced back to central Asia.
  • There were once 15,000 varieties of apples growing in the United States, now there 500 varieties.
  • Apples harvested at the end of apple season will store the longest – several months, as compared with apples harvested in the beginning of apple season – several weeks.
  • Apples store best in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator.
  • An apple with the peel contains 50% more nutrients than an apple without the peel.
  • Raw apples contain more nutrients than cooked apples.
  • Apples are a good source of vitamins C and K and potassium.
  • Good source of pectin and other fibers.
  • Rich source of flavonoids.

Sources:

The 52 New Foods Challenge by Jennifer Tyler Lee, Encyclopedia of Healing Foods by Michael Murray, Joseph Pizzorno, and Lara Pizzorno, Superfoods by Tonia Reinhard, Eating on the Wild Side by Jo Robinson, and The Botany of Desire by Michael Pollan

 

Feb. 2017 – Book of the Month – The Hormone Cure

I first heard of Dr. Sarah Gottfried from Abel James’ podcast, The Fat-Burning Man. My husband is a HUGE fan (and, well, honestly, he’s pretty easy on the eyes AND he knows nutrition!). Then she was a guest on The Balanced Bites Podcast. After listening to both episodes, I knew I had to check out her book.

The book is focused on women’s health, but many of her dietary and lifestyle recommendations apply to both men and women. I also appreciate how much she loves yoga – she’s a woman after my own heart.

Are you dealing with cortisol problems? Low Progesterone? High Estrogen? Or maybe it’s low estrogen that troubles you? What about your androgen levels? Under active Thyroid?  Regardless of your specific hormone challenges, Dr. Gottfried’s book can help you. One of the great things about this book is that it is not necessarily meant to be read cover-to-cover. After rea
ding the introduction and taking the quiz, the reader can jump to the chapter that addresses their specific challenges. She includes anecdotal stories from patients that have used The Hormone Cure to address their hormone imbalances naturally.

For each hormonal imbalance issue, Dr. Gottfried details the science about the hormone, what happens when it is high/low, which testing to seek out (if applicable), and a multi-step protocol for improving the hormone levels, which includes, lifestyle changes and nutraceutical supplement recommendations, herbal supplement recommendations, and bioidentical hormones.

If you or a loved one is dealing with hormonal imbalances, you can take back your life and find balance. This book is a great guide to get back to equilibrium.

Jan. 2017 – Book of the Month – The Great Cholesterol Myth

I first heard of The Great Cholesterol Myth when I was attending Bauman College. A fellow student had read the book when she was diagnosed with high cholesterol in her mid-20’s. She wasn’t satisfied with the idea of being on statins for the rest of her life. This peaked my interest and so when it was time to do research on a topic relating to heart health, I read the book. Several months after reading the book, I went to the Paleo F(x) conference and saw Jonny Bowden speak.

If you’ve ever been concerned about your cholesterol levels or if high cholesterol runs in your family, this is a must read. It was a fascinating read and paradigm-shifting book. And yet, the authors are able to break down this very complicated topic so that even the non-health nut, non-science-y folks can learn a great deal.

SPOILER ALERT: Rather than animal foods that are rich in cholesterol and saturated fats, the authors build a very strong case that processed foods, sugar, soda, trans fats, and vegetable oils are the main culprits in our SAD diet (Standard American Diet). They also suggest that lifestyle factors, like STRESS, need to be dealt with in order to keep cholesterol levels in healthy ranges. Another SPOILER ALERT: Bowden and Sinatra demonstrate what the pharmaceutical companies don’t want us to know: “…[c]holesterol is a relatively minor player in heart disease and a poor predictor of heart attacks” (p.31, Bowden & Sinatra, 2012).

I’ll leave you with these facts about cholesterol:

  • Cholesterol is a waxy steroid that is found in every cell membrane in your body.
  • Without sufficient levels of cholesterol in your diet, your body will make it (in the liver) because it is essential.
  • It is a building block for important structures such as sex hormones, bile, vitamin D, and it supports brain function, serotonin production, and it acts as an antioxidant.
  • It also helps to digest fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K), insulates the nerves, and aids in fighting infection.

In the wise words of LeVar Burton, “of course, you don’t have to take *my* word for it.”

Dec. 2016 Book of the Month – GAPS Gut and Psychology Syndrome

I first heard the term GAPS on Pinterest about five years ago when I started finding and pinning healthy recipes. I continued moving forward on my path toward healthy eating and becoming a Nutrition Consultant and I kept hearing about GAPS all along the way. I bought the book well over a year ago and it’s been on my list of books to read for quite some time. I finally picked it up a few months ago and got to reading it.

Gut and Psychology Syndrome was written by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride. She wrote this book as a practical guide for those suffering from all host of mental illness issues including autism, dyslexia, dyspraxia, and ADHD,  as well as asthma, eczema, and allergies. I hate to be redundant here but “All disease begins in the gut” and so this too is a book about healing the gut in order to heal the domino of other issues that cascade after an inflamed and irritated gut.

Campbell-McBride draws upon her experience as neurologist, as well as her experience as a mother of an autistic child to detail the inner workings (pun intended) of the digestive system, the gut flora, the immune system, and how the gut and brain are connected. Later, she details how to treat the problems, with food and supplementation.

I’ll leave you with a quote: “In GAPS people, due to the abnormalities in their gut flora, viruses from vaccines or the environment have a good chance to survive and persist” (p.29). Some folks will tell you that it’s all in your head, but I’m starting to think that it’s all in your gut.

If you’re interested in learning more about the gut and how to improve your own health, GAPS Gut and Psychology Syndrome is an amazing resource.

Oct. 2016 Book of the Month – Practical Paleo 2nd Edition

This month’s Clean Eating Book of the Month is a little different than usual. Typically I read and review informational health books, not usually cookbooks. BUT Practical Paleo, 2nd Edition is actually both. It’s chock full of recipes, but it’s also a huge resource for health information. It’s almost like a BOGO. 🙂

For me, the great thing about all of Diane’s work is that we both went to the same nutrition school – Bauman College, so I know that we are coming from the same background.

First, let me say that this book is HUGE. And by huge I mean filled to the brim with tasty recipes. You will not feel deprived when cooking recipes from Practical Paleo. And the photography is beautiful, as always! I can’t tell you how much I hate a cookbook without pictures! The great thing about her recipe section is that each recipe has easy-to-understand icons indicating if foods have eggs, nightshades, are slow cooker friendly, 21 DSD compliant, or can easily be frozen. Her recipe icon list includes many more options. Diane’s recipes are also straightforward, easy to follow, and delicious.

In addition to the amazing recipes, there are about 90 pages of meal plans that can support many different health conditions. She details 14 different health conditions/targeted meal plans, and includes information about the health condition, things to add, things to avoid, some possible supplements to consider, and a 30 day meal plan. Wow! And the second addition has three new meal plans.

The other major section of the book is about food and your body. In typical Diane fashion, she breaks down the nutritional biochemistry of how food works in your body. She spends time explaining paleo and helps folks transition into a paleo lifestyle. There are several handy one-page guides that explain about healthy fats, sweeteners, carbs, paleo foods, and more. She uses the latest scientific information to debunk myths. There is a section that details how digestion works and how to repair it when it’s not working. Diane details autoimmune conditions and balancing blood sugar. And let’s not forget the Poop Pageant!

5:5 StrawberriesThis book has been dubbed the Paleo bible for a good reason. It really has everything you need to understand about a whole-food based diet. Naturally, this book gets…. 5 Strawberries! I highly recommend going out and getting yourself a copy.

 

Here is a picture of me with Diane and my new book at the book tour in San Francisco.

 

7/12/14

TeamKLB,

Second round of chemo is going a bit better than the first so far. Definitely tired, but maybe a bit less tired than before. Or maybe I’m just used to having less energy? Hair shaving party went well. It was a very emotional day for me, and considering that I’m quite the crier, I didn’t cry too much. 😉 I definitely had some second thoughts about whether to have the party. I had a lot of anxiety leading up to the party, but in the end, it was the right decision for me to be surrounded by #teamklb. I felt loved and supported and it was easier for me show my bald head to world after showing it to y’all first. Thanks to those of you who made it, and to those of you that were there in spirit. It trHair shaving partyuly means a lot. My hairstylist came and did my makeup first, which I think was a good decision for me. Thanks Laura! A good friend of mine took photos for me. Thanks Vanessa! Thanks for the food, the positive energy, and the gifts that I continue to receive – you are all too generous!  I appreciate you all more than you will ever know.

 

I recently read Anticancer, by David Servan-Schreiber. Highly recommended by the way! He helps to bridge the gap between what your doctors are telling you and what they aren’t telling you – like what you can do to help yourself. This is what people diagnosed with a disease want to hear – give me some control and power when I feel like I have no control and no power over this situation.  He is an MD and a PHD and a two time brain cancer survivor- so this isn’t quackery here! Main recommendations: 1) eat a diet similar to what we already eat – lots of plants, quality meats, low sugar, low refined carbs, low poor fats, 2) meditation 3) support groups, 4) exercise. This brings me to my “favors”. One, there are two support groups that I’d like to attend, but they’re on Tuesday nights in Palo Alto and I’m not driving much these days. If you’re interested and free on the first and third Tuesdays, let me know and we can talk details. Two, I’m interested in trying to go for a walk everyday -30 minutes is recommended, and I’d like a buddy to help me get motivated to get out when I’m feeling tired and to be there on the walks with me just in case I’m not feeling good and I don’t want to be far from home and alone. I’m thinking evenings to avoid the heat and sun (chemo drugs and sun don’t mix well). Again, hit me up if you like to be a regular walking buddy or an occasional buddy. I’m open to whatever.

Again, #teamklb, I’m eternally grateful.

Xoxoxo,

Katie

Sept. 2016 Book of the Month – Gut

September’s Clean Eating Book of the Month is Gut by Giulia Enders. After Eat Dirt, Brain Maker, and Gulp, you may begin to think that I’m obsessed with the digestive system. And well, I guess I am. I am a nutrition consultant, after all.

Enders takes a unique scientific approach to teaching us about our gut. A microbiologist by trade and currently enrolled in a gastroenterologgut-imagey PhD program, Enders infuses humor throughout her book and her sister creates simple and enlightening illustrations like this one of how to properly use the toilet to go poop (Ender, 2015, p.19).

I hear from many people that like to debate the existence of gluten intolerances. Enders does a wonderful job of clearing up the confusion for folks. Celiac disease is what Enders terms a genetic intolerance to gluten. Here is how she explains a gluten intolerance: All grains (and all plants for that matter) have a small amount of toxins in them. These toxins exist to ensure the survival of the species. Compared to other grains, wheat produces more toxins. Because of the high level of toxins in the proteins in wheat, gluten (and gliadin), can pass through the small intestines into the bloodstream, undigested. In turn, it can weaken the junctions between the cell lining the small intestines (microvilli). When those junctions are weakened, food particles (like gluten) can pass through unregulated and cause the immune system to go on overdrive. The job of the microvilli is to keep out large (undigested) food particles and toxins, so when food particles are allowed to pass through and the immune system is on overdrive, many other health problems occur, resulting in an intolerance.

In addition to clearing up confusion around food intolerances, Enders also discusses poop, acid reflux, constipation, vomiting, the brain-gut connection, the HUGE role of bacteria in our lives, and much more. This is a fascinating poop book. I actually did type poop there first, so I thought I should leave it. 😉 I highly recommend it for all homo sapiens. 5/5 Strawberries!5:5 Strawberries

 

Aug. 2016 Book of the Month – Brain Maker

After reading Grain Brain, by Dr. David Perlmutter, when Brain Maker came out, I knew that I would have to read it too. At Paleo F(x) this year, Dr. Perlmutter was the keynote speaker, promptly reminding me that I needed to read his book.

As a nutrition consultant, gut health is one of my main passions, because as Hippocrates said, “All disease begins in the gut.” A neurologist by trade, Dr. Perlmutter goes even further to discuss the links between an unhealthy gut and Autism, ADHD, allergies skin issues, elevated blood pressure, anxiety, depression, chronic fatigue, inflammation, and many, many, more.

Out of the trillions of cells that are housed in your sack of skin that we call a body, 90% of them are bacteria. You read that correctly; you are 90% bacteria. Now don’t freak out. Without all of that bacteria, you literally wouldn’t be living. Dr. Perlmutter helps us to get acquainted with those bacteria and help us see just why we need all of those friendly little buggars. He then helps us to know what factors can throw our delicate ecosystem off balance. Some of those factors include: antibiotics, nsaid use, oral contraceptives, the chemical laden agri-business food system, among others.

Dr. Perlmutter gives action steps to help preserve and maintain a thriving colony of gut bacteria. The book is also equipped with recipes that include probiotics and help to maintain the gut colony. This book is hi5:5 Strawberriesghly recommend for those interested in improving their gut health or just like to nerd out on science and healthy living.

 

July 2016 Book of the Month – Gulp

The July 2016 Book of the Month is Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach. While attending Bauman College, for my Nutrition Consultant certification, one of my teachers recommended this book to me. It was fascinating! I give Gulp *5 strawberries*. 5:5 Strawberries

Roach begins the book at the beginning of the digestive system, or alimentary canal, as she refers to it, and works her way to end of the alimentary canal, detailing the function of each organ along the way. She interweaves anecdotal stories and humor throughout the book making it delightful, funny, and thoroughly educational.

Is it weird to admit that the chapter that sticks with me the most is the chapter on fecal transplants? This book was the first time that I had heard of them, but since reading it, I have heard of the idea in several other books and podcasts. Roach illustrates that in our current society, we have demonized all bacteria and become a culture sanitizing madmen. And while bacteria can be harmful, bacteria also makes up 90% of all the cells in our body and we wouldn’t be living without bacteria. Currently, fecal transplants are mainly used to cure C. diff  infections, but doctors and researchers are finding that there could be a greater need for fecal transplants due to the overuse
of antibiotics and sanitizing efforts. Roach states “Rarely does medical science come up with a treatment so effective, inexpensive, and free of side effects” (Roach, 2013, p.321). The main side effect is probably the “ick factor”.  😉 I finished the book thinking that this might possibly the way of the future.

I highly recommend Gulp to anyone that is fascinated by the amazing human body.