What will be Your Catalyst for Change?

Many of us want to make a change in our diet, lifestyle habits, or routines, but something holds us back. Maybe because it pushes us out of our comfort zone? Maybe because it takes work to change our habits? Maybe it is hard to fit in the budget? Whatever your barrier is, it is holding you back.

Health complications that typically develop later in life are a result of diet and lifestyle factors that have been accumulating over many years. Think of when a smoker develops lung cancer. When that person develops lung cancer, it’s highly likely that they wish they would have quit smoking earlier or never started smoking in the first place. I would venture to say that the same is true for most major health problems. Whether it is an Autoimmune condition, Cancer, Type II Diabetes, high blood pressure, Fibromyalgia, or even Leaky Gut, most people’s first reactions include wishing they had made different choices in the past. The problem with this approach to change is that it is reactionary. It’s filled with wouldas, couldas, and shouldas. It’s also filled with a lot of self-blame and self-hate.

There were three words that left me speechless and petrified. “Katie, I’m sorry to have to IMG_0521tell you this, but it’s cancer.” In the days, weeks, and months following my diagnosis, I asked myself what I could have, should have, and would have done differently. The list was endless: I would have been very strict about my monthly self-exams, I wouldn’t have taken the HRT (hormone replacement therapy) to help combat my cycle-driven migraines, I would have pushed my doctors to get that mammogram at age 30 that I had told myself I would get because I have a strong family history of breast cancer, I would not have taken countless rounds of antibiotics for acne as well as for sinus infections, I would have found ways to manage my stress levels more appropriately, and I would not have taken bottles and bottles of NSAIDs to deal with my headaches. I could go on, but I’ll spare you. (I’m definitely not encouraging people to blame themselves, but to wonder what we could have done differently is only natural.)

The problem with this reactionary approach is that while we can make changes going forward, often times, the damage has been done. However, the bigger problem to this approach is that there are usually warning signs that something is “off” and we ignore those signs. Acid reflux/ heartburn, also called GERD (Gastroesophageal reflux disease) is common and is therefore thought of as “normal”. It is not normal. It is a sign of a bigger issue. Most people just pop a few antacids (a Band-Aid) and continue on with their lives, never stopping to get to the root of the problem. It starts to become “your new normal” and then just normal. And since so many people have it, the root cause is rarely questioned. The same could be said for headaches, stomach-aches (actually, they usually are pains in the small intestine or large intestine, so the term gutache would be more accurate), skin rashes, acne, and other so-called normal problems. These are warming signs that our diets and lifestyles need an overhaul.

Allow me to digress. While reading, The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food by Dan Barber I came across the section about sustainable organic farming practices. The farmer that Barber interviews discusses his approach to weed management. Soil is living and filled with microorganisms. Good farming practices ensure the health and fertility of the soil. Soil is also full of micronutrients, when it has the appropriate micronutrient levels, there are no weeds. However, when there are micronutrients missing, weeds begin to appear. Each weed indicates a specific deficiency and when that deficiency is addressed, that type of weed disappears. The overarching idea is that these weeds are indicators of larger systemic problem that can be addressed by adding back the missing micronutrients. Now I realize we aren’t the soil, but let me continue to digress just a bit more. If you extrapolate that idea to humans, it might play out like this: minor health problems (the weeds) are a sign of a systemic problem (nutrient deficiency, lifestyle factors, environmental factors, gut issues, etc.), so to address the minor health problems you need to address the systemic problem and circumvent any larger health problems down the road (a garden overtaken by weeds). Thanks for allowing me to digress. Now back to your regularly scheduled programming.

Screen Shot 2016-07-05 at 11.29.07 AM

You can stop this cycle. You don’t have to have a frightening diagnosis. You can return to health. I bet you have even identified the “normal problem” that you’ve been mostly ignoring.

Start with that nagging problem. Start a journal to find patterns and trends. See if you can tie your headaches/heartburn/breakout/etc. to a food, habit, or environmental factor (like cleaners and body products). A basic daily journal would include the following:

Breakfast – foods and liquids: _________________________

Snack – foods and liquids: ____________________________

Lunch – foods and liquids: ____________________________

Dinner – foods and liquids: ___________________________

Additional liquids: _________________________________

Supplements (dose and time):_________________________

Medication(dose and time):___________________________

Exercise: _________________________________________

Sleep: ___________________________________________

Relaxation: _______________________________________

Mood/Emotions: ___________________________________

Nagging Problem? Time? Duration? ______________________

After a 3-4 weeks, it’s likely that you’ll see a trend, which can then lead you to a hypothesis. With the hypothesis, you can then seek additional help from Dr. Google, books, your doctor, a chiropractor, a physical therapist, a Nutrition Consultant (ME!), or a naturopath. By choosing to gain control of the nagging issue, you can remove yourself from the path to the bigger and scarier health concern that was down the road.

Obviously I cannot guarantee that because you have a minor common health problem that you are going to get a larger, scarier health concern. No one knows that. But what I can say is that even the minor health concern is negatively impacting your life. Why not make a change and a commitment to feel the best that you possibly can?

What will be your catalyst for change? What are you waiting for? Will you wait for things to get worse? Or will you heed the warning signs that your body is giving you?

Hugs & Health <3,

Katie

DISCLAIMER 

References:

Barber, D. (2015). The Third Plate: Field Notes from the Future of Food. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Ready to Detox? The 21 DSD Q&A

Are you on a Blood Sug1-21DSDCoach-Im-Certified-Graphicar Roller Coaster? Need coffee, sugar, or other pick me ups just to get through the day? Are you feeling like you need a reset?

Then you are in the right place! I am a Certified 21-Day Sugar Detox Coach. Please read through the Q & A before we can get started. 🙂

21 Day Sugar Detox Question and Answer:

Do I need a 21 Day Sugar Detox Coach?
Why should I get a coach for The 21 Day Sugar Detox?
  • Accountability Partner – I’ll act as a partner in helping to keep you motivated and committed to The 21DSD.
  • It’ll provide a sense of community with our group members.
  • I will provide personalized help for your specific needs.
  • It’s easier than going it alone, especially if you haven’t made drastic changes to your diet before.
  • I can provide you with suggestions for local resource options.
What experiences do you have working as a Coach?
  • Worked with about 50 different clients of varying ages, health needs, and diets.
  • Specializing in blood sugar regulation, candida infections, cancer & recovery, digestion problems, pregnancy, diverticulitis, and skin problems.
  • I’m also an elementary school teacher, which is essentially an academic coach for children. 😉
How will your coaching help me personally?
  • Daily three-minute educational videos, check-ins, and support
  • Exclusive access to our 21 DSD Facebook group for resources
  • Participant workbook with The 21 DSD detox curriculum
  • Daily motivation
  • Local suggestions for eating out
  • Local suggestions for grocery shopping and shopping lists
  • Results!
Do I need to be “paleo”? Can vegetarians participate? Pregnant or Nursing Mothers? Athletes?
  • You do not have to be paleo to participate.
  • Pescetarians (vegetarians that eat fish) can participate in the 21DSD.
  • If you are pregnant or are nursing, there are modifications that you can make in order to complete the 21DSD.
  • There are also modifications for athletes as well.
How much does it cost?
  • August group Online price: $149 per person (guidebook included!)
  • Local August in-person group: $199 per person (guidebook included!)
When does the 21DSD start?
  • Our detoxes generally start on the first Monday of the month, with coaching and prepping for the detox starting the week before. You can actually start whenever you’d like, if our start date doesn’t work for you.
  • September detox begins on 9/10 and coaching begins on 9/3
  • October detox begins on 10/1 and coaching begins on 9/24
Ready to join?

I’m ready to join, Coach!

  • Online 21-Day Sugar Detox Coaching with Katie

 

 

  • In-Person 21-Day Sugar Detox Coaching with Katie

 

 

Not ready to join?
  • I’ll be running another group starting when you’re ready! Email me!
  • I also offer one-on-one holistic nutritional counseling in which I provide menu planning, supplement suggestions, recipes, educational handouts, and more!

Refund Policy:

Participants may postpone their detox start date within three months of payment. Once materials have been distributed, no refunds will be issued.

2-21DSDCoach-AffiliateGraphic

10 Free Things to Improve Your Health

Ten Free Things to Improve Your Health

  1. Chew Well! – This is like pre-digestion. Your digestive system will be able to absorb more nutrients and work more efficiently with well-chewed food.
  2. Sit & Relax During Meals – When you are eating while standing, driving, sitting at your desk, or eating while stressed, your brain is in “fight or flight” mode and that’s all your body can do. When you eat, in order to truly digest food and absorb nutrients, your brain and your body need to be in “rest, digest, feed, and breed” mode. Take the extra time during each meal to sit, relax, and enjoy your food.
  3. Meal Planning – Planning your weekly meals at the beginning of the week and before heading to the store can help lower your grocery bill and help you stick to your eating plan.
  4. Drink more Water – Are you drinking 64 oz. of water each day? Try keeping track of your fluid intake to see how much water you drink.
  5. Exercise Each Day – Make sure you get at least 30 minutes of physical activity each day. Nearly every health condition can be helped with physical activity.
  6. Sleep – Try making your bedroom as dark as a cave. Using technology (especially tablets and smartphones) before bed is not recommended. Getting 7-9 hours of sleep is recommended. Your organs repair and regenerate while you sleep, not enough sleep means much more than just feeling tired.
  7. Elimination – How often are you having a bowel movement? What is the consistency like? Everyone is different, but adults should be having at least one to two bowel movements each day (should be semi-firm).
  8. Relaxation – Find some way to relieve stress and relax each day. Exercise and/or prayer/meditation are good ways to relieve stress.working in my garden
  9. Socialization/Connectedness – This is another way to help relieve stress. Humans are naturally social beings and today we are often very isolated from others. Joining a club or organization is a great way to get connected.
  10. Go Outside! – Get some sunlight and vitamin D and connect with nature. Try “Earthing” by walking barefoot and absorbing the Earth’s energy and negative ions.

Health & Hugs <3

Katie