Quick & Easy Deviled Eggs

This is quite possibly the easiest deviled eggs that you’ll ever make. I had a dinner gathering to attend and completely forgot that I said I’d bring an appetizer. We had basically ZERO food in the fridge, but we did have eggs, Primal Kitchen Chipotle Lime Mayo, a lime, and cilantro. So I decided to give it a go! My uncle raved about these deviled eggs, so I knew they were good enough to make again for Christmas Eve dinner at a friend’s house. There were already deviled eggs at the party, (OOPS!) but mine flew off the platter. Needless to say, I knew I needed to blog about this recipe.

I would love to know your thoughts!

Recipe:

6 eggs, hardboiled

1/4 cup Primal Kitchen Chipotle Lime Mayo

half of 1 lime, juiced

1 tsp. sea salt

paprika, for garnish

12 cilantro leaves , for garnish

Maldon sea salt (optional), for garnish

Directions:

  1. If you have an Instant Pot, you *need* to hard boil your eggs with it. Even farm fresh eggs peel like butter. Add 1 cup of water to the IP. Place 6 eggs in the IP on the removable rack or in a steamer basket. Using the Manual feature and the + / – button to adjust to 7 minutes. (I have found that 7 minutes is the sweet spot for me, but yours may range from 6-8 minutes). When the IP is done, manually release the pressure and add eggs to an ice bath to stop the eggs from continuing to cook. Peel! If you don’t have an Instant Pot, you should get one! In all seriousness, feel free to hard boil your eggs however you like.
  2. Once the eggs are peeled, halve the eggs. Place the yolks, mayo, sea salt, and lime juice in a bowl. Use an immersion blender to combine the ingredients until the texture is smooth and creamy.
  3. Spoon the yolk mixture back into the eggs.
  4. Sprinkle with paprika and Maldon sea salt (if using).  Add a cilantro leaf to each deviled egg.
  5. Enjoy!

 

PS – I can’t wait for Primal Kitchen Santa Cruz to open. I imagine they will be rocking some deviled eggs on their menu too. It is estimated to open in April of 2018.

PPS – Oh and the even better news, these are 21 Day Sugar Detox compliant!

 

The 52 New Foods Challenge – Eggplant

The 52 New Foods Challenge Food of the Week: Eggplant

Confession time, I don’t like eggplant at all. The texture is too mushy for me and flavor isn’t that great either. But I’d like to like it, so I’ll keep trying it and see if I can like it one day. Jennifer Tyler Lee suggests an eggplant stir fry or a grilled eggplant with a minty yogurt dip (the minty yogurt dip might be able to convince me).

Food Facts:

  • Cooking does not destroy the important nutrients of eggplan.
  • It is a member of the nightshade family – a relative of tomatoes, peppers, and potatoes
  • Good source of vitamins B1, B6, potassium, manganese, magnesium, phosphorous, niacin,  folic acid, copper, and thiamineLufa_Farms_Eggplant
  • Good source of fiber
  • Rich source of antioxidants including phenols, anthocyanins, and plants sterols
  • Lowers blood cholesterol levels
  • Helps fight free radicals
  • Have been shown to protect cell membranes

From The 52 New Foods Challenge: A Family Cooking Adventure for Each Week of the Year, with 150 Recipesby Jennifer Tyler Lee, Encyclopedia of Healing Foods
by Michael Murray, Joseph Pizzorno, and Lara Pizzorno and Superfoods: The Healthiest Foods on the Planetby Tonia Reinhard

The 52 New Foods Challenge – Zucchini


The 52 New Foods Challenge Food of the Week: Zucchini

Again, I find myself behind!! 🙁 but I’ll be catching back up over the next few days. In my opinion, it’s a bit early for zucchini to be listed here – it’s not typically “in season” until late spring or early summer in most paces in the US, so I won’t be buying any until it’s at my farmers market. Anywho, besides sautéed as side dish and ZOODLES (zucchini noodles), paleo zucchini muffins are my favorite way to eat it! I love Danielle Walker’s recipe! Against All Grain: Delectable Paleo Recipes to Eat Well & Feel Great Oh and zucchini chips are pretty BOMB!

Food Facts:

  • Squash blossoms are used commonly in Italian cooking
  • Summer squash isn’t as rich in nutrients as winter squash because of the high water content (81%)
  • They are very low in calories
  • Good source of vitamin C, potassium, and carotenes
  • Squash has Anticancer effects – prevents cell mutations
  • It’s great to consume squash in the summer because it helps prevent dehydration and the carotenes help protect against sun damage (Nature is so smart!!)
  • Small to medium sized squash will have a superior flavor to really large squash
  • It does contain high levels of oxalates, so if you have a history of oxalate containing kidney stones, avoid over consumption.

From The 52 New Foods Challenge: A Family Cooking Adventure for Each Week of the Year, with 150 Recipes by Jennifer Tyler Lee and Encyclopedia of Healing Foods by Michael Murray, Joseph Pizzorno, and Lara Pizzorno

The 52 New Foods Challenge – Asparagus

The 52 New Foods Challenge Food of the Week: Asparagus

The first spring food for our challenge! (That puts me at least a couple week behind!) Jennifer Tyler Lee suggests roasting asparagus or adding them to a frittata. A couple of weeks ago, when I found them at my favorite vendor at my local farmers market for the first time this season, I decided to make cream of asparagus soup. The recipe I had called for heavy cream, but I decided to paleo-ify it by using cashew cream instead. It was great! I’ll be making it again!

Food Facts:

  • The season generally starts in March and only is a few months long, so I rarely buy asparagus after spring is over
  • Asparagus is best cooked and served as soon as it is harvested, so growing your own is highly recommended. When purchased from the farmers market or store, cook within a few days
  • Shorter spears are up to ten times sweeter than spears that are 10+ inches long
  • Cooked asparagus is more nutritious than raw and steaming is the most nutritious way to cook it
  • Purple asparagus is more nutritious than green asparagus
  • Member of the lily family
  • Good source of vitamins A, C, and K, and potassium, folate, thiamine, riboflavin, manganese, and copper
  • Good source of fiber
  • Includes antioxidants lutein and beta-carotene
  • Considered to be a good prebiotic. Our digestive systems are home to billions of bacteria (when they are functioning well, that is) and the bacteria colony needs to prebiotics to thrive
  • Because of their high fiber content, they help to lower cholesterol
  • Asparagus has been shown to suppress the growth of liver cancer cell

From The 52 New Foods Challenge: A Family Cooking Adventure for Each Week of the Year, with 150 Recipes by Jennifer Tyler Lee, Encyclopedia of Healing Foods by Michael Murray, Joseph Pizzorno, and Lara Pizzorno, and Superfoods: The Healthiest Foods on the Planet
by Tonia Reinhard

Photo Credit: Luv Kreativ Photography https://www.instagram.com/luvkreativ/?hl=en

In Season, in March

Happy March!

March is one of my favorite months because SPRING officially begins and because my birthday is in March. 🙂 As for what’s in season in Northern California in March, I wish there were fruits that were in season besides citrus fruits, but since there aren’t, I’m enjoying the citrus. March is officially asparagus season in most of North America. After reading Barbara Kingsolver’s Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life I decided that I would only be eating asparagus during the late winter and early spring. 

It’s what I’m most excited for this month! Bring on the stinky pee!! What seasonal produce are you going to enjoy in March?

Hugs and Health <3,

Katie

 

The 52 New Foods Challenge – Kumquats

The 52 New Foods Challenge Food of the Week: Kumquats

Jennifer Tyler Lee suggests making a kumquat jam or in a warm salad with green beans. Mmmmm! After my January 21 Day Sugar Detox, I bought some kumquats again and man were they tart! I think the jam may be the way to go!!

Food Facts:

  • IMG_0171Good source of vitamin C
  • Good source of fiber
  • The oval shaped variety, Nagami, is more tart, and the round variety, Marumi is more sweet
  • Eat citrus fruits shorty after buying or store them in your fridge, but do not store in a plastic bag – it retains the moisture and promotes mold growth
  • The white parts (albedo) of citrus fruits is the most nutritious – since kumquats are eaten whole- you consume a lot of the albedo.
  • Contains antioxidants called flavonoids
  • Organic citrus fruits have not been degreened

From Eating on the Wild Side: The Missing Link to Optimum Health by Jo Robinson, The 52 New Foods Challenge: A Family Cooking Adventure for Each Week of the Year, with 150 Recipes by Jennifer Tyler Lee, and Superfoods: The Healthiest Foods on the Planet
by Tonia Reinhard

The 52 New Foods Challenge – Edamame

The 52 New Foods Challenge Food of the Week: Edamame

This was this past week’s new food. While I’m not a big fan of soy products, organic and non-gmo edamame is okay by me if you can tolerate it well. Also fermented soy products (miso and tempeh) are okay as well, but all others, including tofu, soymilk, etc. are on my avoid list.

Food Facts: IMG_0161

  • Good source of folate, manganese, thiamine, riboflavin, copper, selenium, calcium, potassium, zinc, iron, and vitamin K.
  • Complete source of plant protein (contains all of the essential amino acids).
  • Contains isoflavones – antioxidants that reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis, and diabetes.
  • A good source of fiber and protein.
  • Most soy products sold in America are loaded with pesticides and have been genetically modified. Always choose organic and Non-GMO
  • It scores 48/1000 on the ANDI scale (a rating of nutrients per calorie)

From Eating on the Wild Side: The Missing Link to Optimum Health
by Jo Robinson, The 52 New Foods Challenge: A Family Cooking Adventure for Each Week of the Year, with 150 Recipes by Jennifer Tyler Lee, and Superfoods: The Healthiest Foods on the Planet by Tonia Reinhard

The 52 New Foods Challenge – Romanesco

The 52 New Foods Challenge Food of the Week: Romanesco

I LOVE roasted crucifers, and this one  is no exception. Jennifer Tyler Lee also recommends sautéing it with EVOO (I would use butter) and lemon and parmesan. Sounds yummy too!! I recently made “cauli rice” using romanesco and it was delicious! 🙂

Food Facts: IMG_0147

  • Member of the cruciferous family- related to cauliflower
  • Contains four times more glucosinolates than white cauliflower
  • Cauliflowers have a lower respiration rate than broccoli and therefore can be stored for up to a week in the fridge without compromising the nutritional value.
  • Was developed from wild cabbage
  • Cancer fighting vegetable
  • Good source of B Vitamins, vitamin K, & C, potassium, phosphorous, boron, and fiber
  • On the ANDI scale it scores 295/1000 (a rating of nutrients per calorie)

From The 52 New Foods Challenge: A Family Cooking Adventure for Each Week of the Year, with 150 Recipes by Jennifer Tyler Lee, Eating on the Wild Side: The Missing Link to Optimum Health by Jo Robinson, and Encyclopedia of Healing Foods by Michael Murray, Joseph Pizzorno, and Lara Pizzorno

The 52 New Foods Challenge – Bok Choy

The 52 New Foods Challenge Food of the Week: Bok Choy

Food Facts: 172a2806-edit-bok-choy-1500px

  • Higher nutritional content than cabbage
  • Member of the cruciferous family
  • Contains high level of antioxidants making it great for fighting free radicals and preventing cancer
  • High levels of beta-carotene- 11th highest food source of vitamin A
  • Good source of Vitamins B6, K, & C, potassium, folate, iron, manganese, and calcium
  • It ranks 5th on the ANDI scale and scores 865/1000 (a rating of nutrients per calorie)

From The 52 New Foods Challenge: A Family Cooking Adventure for Each Week of the Year, with 150 Recipesand www.whfoods.com.

The 52 New Foods Challenge – Radicchio

Working on catching up a bit, Radicchio is the new food for late December, but would still be in season now. 🙂

Food facts: IMG_0124

  • Is from the chicory family
  • Has four times more antioxidants than romaine lettuce
  • There are red and green varieties, as well as oval and round
  • Red varieties are more nutrient dense than green varieties
  • Tends to be very bitter, but roasting or grilling it helps make it much less bitter

From Eating on the Wild Side: The Missing Link to Optimum Health
by Jo Robinson and The 52 New Foods Challenge: A Family Cooking Adventure for Each Week of the Year, with 150 Recipesby Jennifer Tyler Lee