Massaged Kale Salad

Massaging Kale? Is she kidding? Nope, not kidding. Kale is a great veggie and is all the rage these days, BUT it can be hard for some to digest when eaten raw. It’s a very dense leafy green and massaging it can help break it down (aka pre-digestion) which makes it easier to digest. You can use about a tablespoon of olive oil and just get in there with your hands and massage away!     

Massaged Kale Salad

cleaneatingwithkatie
Kale is all the rage these days but for some people, when eaten raw it can cause digestive distress. When massaged with some extra virgin olive oil, it can help to make the kale more digestible. This salad is a like a taste of spring in every bite because combines many spring veggies.
Prep Time 15 mins
Course Main Course, Salad
Cuisine American
Servings 4 people

Ingredients
  

Salad Ingredients

  • 8 hard-boiled eggs pasture-raised
  • 2 large beets boiled, peeled, & sliced
  • 1 bunch kale destemmed & coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup sprouted quinoa cooked
  • 6 carrots sliced into strips using a veggie peeler
  • cup pine nuts
  • 1 sumo citrus peeled & segmented
  • ¼ cup broccoli sprouts

Salad Dressing Ingredients

  • 2 lemons juiced
  • 4 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp garlic sea salt
  • 1 tsp lemon pepper

Instructions
 

  • Add 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil to a large bowl with the chopped kale. Massage oil into the kale leaves until well coated.
  • Add the quinoa and toss. Then add the beet slices and carrot strips. Toss again.
  • Plate out a serving of the kale, quinoa, beet, and carrot mixture. 
  • Top with two sliced hard-boiled eggs, 3-4 segments of sumo citrus, sprouts, and some pine nuts. 
  • Add dressing ingredients into a small glass jar and shake. 
  • Drizzle dressing over the salad and enjoy!

Notes

  • I prefer to use sprouted grains whenever possible. I usually buy TruRoots, and I can find it at Sprouts, Whole Foods, and Costco. I enjoy buying Love Beets when I don't have the time to boil and peel my own. I can also find these at Costco, Whole Foods, and Sprouts. You can change out any of these ingredients and keep this salad fresh and evolving with the seasons. I chose these items because they are in season in mid spring.
Keyword gluten-free, kale salad, salad, seasonal salad

Beetroot Relish

Avocado Toast from Bricklane Melbourne.

Who doesn’t love Brunch? Recreating an avocado toast that we had in Melbourne at Bricklane Melbourne has been on my to-do list since we got back. It was one of the best brunches of my life (although Melbourne was filled with epic Brunches). This brunch is certainly not identical, but I was after that BEETROOT RELISH and Jim and I both conquer that IT IS DELISH.

My Avocado Toast with Beetroot Relish.

Beetroot Relish

cleaneatingwithkatie
This is just an easy recipe and packs a flavor punch. Beets are also really great for liver and heart health, so it's worth finding a beet recipe that you enjoy.
Cook Time 25 mins
Course Side Dish
Cuisine Australian, European
Servings 8 people

Equipment

  • Cuisenart Food Processor (optional)

Ingredients
  

  • 1 med onion
  • lbs Love Beets (about three packs of Love Beets)
  • ¾ cup water
  • ¾ cup organic sugar
  • cup red wine vinegar
  • sea salt to taste
  • ground pepper to taste

Instructions
 

  • If you do not have Love Beets, you can certainly use fresh beets. Just boil until a knife easily pierces and peel.
  • Grate one medium onion (I prefer to use my Cuisinart Food Processor for this).
  • Grate about 1 3/4 lbs of Love Beets
  • Make a simple syrup with 3/4 cup water and 3/4 cup sugar. Add water and sugar to a medium pot on high. Once dissolved, keep stirring and allow some liquid to evaporate. The goal is to create something between a simple syrup and a simple syrup reduction
  • Add beets, onions, and simple syrup semi-reduction to a large bowl and mix.
  • Add red wine vinegar, sea salt, and pepper and mix.
  • Let sit for a couple of hours or ideally, overnight, for the flavor to meld together. Serve with avocado toast, bacon, feta, and a fried egg (or whatever floats your breakfast boat).
Keyword beet relish, beetroot relish, relish

Paleo Gingered Beets

Most people feel kind of “meh” about beets and I used to be one of those people. I slowly began liking them more and more, but my husband wasn’t having it. He was firmly on the “meh” train. Enter Paleo Gingered Beets. They have revolution-ized beets for him. He could eat them EVERY DAY. I brought these to Easter too and convinced even more beet skeptics. I highly suggest you try the recipe and see if you become a convert!

Paleo Gingered Beets

cleaneatingwithkatie
Most people feel kind of “meh” about beets and I used to be one of those people. Enter Paleo Gingered Beets. They have revolution-ized beets for myself and other beet-skeptics. Once you make the recipe, let me know how you feel.
Cook Time 25 mins
Course Salad, Side Dish
Cuisine American, Asian
Servings 6 people

Ingredients
  

  • 2 packages Love Beets
  • 4 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 in. piece fresh ginger grated
  • 2 tbsp fresh mint, chiffonade
  • 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp coconut aminos soy sauce alternative
  • sea salt to taste
  • fresh ground pepper to taste

Instructions
 

  • If you do not have Love Beets, you can certainly use fresh beets. Just boil until a knife easily pierces and peel.
  • In a small bowl combine coconut aminos, olive oil, vinegar, garlic, ginger, mint, sea salt, and pepper. Whisk to combine. Set aside.
  • In a medium bowl (with a lid), add the beets and then stir to combine all the ingredients. Allow the flavors to enhance by letting it sit in fridge for at least an hour. Enjoy!
Keyword beet salad, beets

Aug. 2014 Book of the Month – Eating on the Wild Side

The Clean Eating August 2014 Book of the Month is Eating on the Wild Side: The Missing Link to Optimum Health by Jo Robinson. I give this book FIVE strawberries- an absolutely fascinating book.Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 5.28.40 PM

Robinson examines the varieties of foods to determine which foods and which varieties are the healthiest. She also looks at the healthiest methods for preparation and when certain food need to be prepared in order to obtain the most nutrients.

When I first worked at the farmer’s market for Tomatero Organic Farms I remember learning about the three varieties of strawberries that we sold, Albion, Seascape, and Chandler. Each day customers would come up and ask about the berries and be shocked to learn that there was more than one type of strawberry. I would always explain that just like apples, all produce has multiple varieties. However, when we shop at the grocery store they generally only have one type of variety. The varieties that are chosen for grocery stores are varieties that ship and travel well, last a fairly long time, and that look appealing to customers. You might think that all produce should look appealing, and I agree, but let me give you one example. The Rosas variety of strawberry (another variety that Tomatero has sold over the years) is a pink berry. Most customers think it is underripe because it is pink, but that isn’t the case, that is just the characteristics of that variety type. That is just one example of how certain produce doesn’t fit our “standards” of looking appealing. [These are my very favorite Strawberry variety, by the way. If you find them, I highly recommend that you try them.]

In Eating on the Wild Side, You’ll learn that sweet potatoes aren’t in the potato (nightshade) family but in the morning glory family, that drinking a glass of beet juice before a run will help you run longer (due to the naturally occurring nitrates), that the outer leaves on lettuces are the most healthy because they make the most chlorophyll, and that broccoli loses most of it’s phytonutrients within 24-hours of harvest – so grow your own or shop at the farmer’s market and look for it on ice.

There’s about million more gems like these in the book, so take a look for yourself and learn how to eat on the wild side.

Hugs & Health <3,

Katie

In Season, in May

May is the first sign of summer produce. It makes me extremely h
appy so see summer produce. For me, it’s the berries that are the most exciting. I could eat a pint of strawberries every day. And actually, I pretty much do. ;-). My husband loves when cherries are in season and it is a pretty short season. I try to buy them for him often during May and June. I have never bought rhubarb, so it should go on my list of things to buy and cook with.

What are you most excited for?

Hugs & Health <3,

Katie

 

In Season, in April

April is here and that means that STRAWBERRY season
is upon us. This means that I will be eating as many strawberries as I possibly can from now until about October.  Here is a list of what is in season in April (in Northern California). 

What are you looking forward to in April?

Hugs & Health <3,

Katie

In Season, in March

Happy March!

March is one of my favorite months because SPRING officially begins and because my birthday is in March. 🙂 As for what’s in season in Northern California in March, I wish there were fruits that were in season besides citrus fruits, but since there aren’t, I’m enjoying the citrus. March is officially asparagus season in most of North America. After reading Barbara Kingsolver’s Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life I decided that I would only be eating asparagus during the late winter and early spring. 

It’s what I’m most excited for this month! Bring on the stinky pee!! What seasonal produce are you going to enjoy in March?

Hugs and Health <3,

Katie

 

In Season, in February

It’s February!! <3 <3 <3 For me, the first day of February means January is over. Woot! I’m not a fan of January. 1.) It’s winter. 2.) It’s cold. 3.) It’s dark really early. 4.) It’s winter. 🙂

With the start of February in Northern California, comes cherry blossoms. I also love seeing trees, plants, and bushes in my garden with little flower buds. Just this morning, I saw blossoms on my blueberry bushes! This fills me with happiness because homegrown blueberries = happiness in my world. 

Well, even though blueberries aren’t on the list, here is what is in season in February. What seasonal produce are you looking forward to? I’m enjoying mandarins and arugula.

Health & Hugs <3,

Katie

 

In Season, in January

Yikes! It’s already January 14th! Better late than not at all. Here is the list of what’s in season [especially in Northern California] in January. 

I’m still enjoying all the cruciferous veggies and the citrus fruits! What seasonal foods do you enjoy in January?

 

 

In Season, in December

It’s December first (not quite sure how that happened!!)! Here is the list of what’s in season in December (especially in Northern California). Mandarins are exciting to see on this list. And I’m excited to have lemons back on my tree!! 

What seasonal produce are you excited for?

 

Health & Hugs <3,

Katie